CILIP Kate Greenaway Medal 2017 winner announced next week, have you read the shortlist?

CILIP Kate Greenaway Medal 2017 shortlist available to borrow from Wokingham Borough Libraries

The Kate Greenaway Medal was established in 1955 for distinguished illustration in a book for children. Named after the popular nineteenth century artist, known for her beautiful children’s illustrations and designs, the CILIP Kate Greenaway Medal is awarded annually for an outstanding book in terms of illustration for children and young people.

CILIP Kate Greenaway Medal 2017 shortlist

wildWild Animals of the North illustrated and written by Dieter Braun

A gorgeously illustrated study of the Northern Hemisphere’s wild animals, this biologically accurate encyclopaedia of beasts will enthral all. Through Dieter Braun’s beautiful and colourful illustrations, readers will be dazzled by the polar bears and orcas of the Arctic, Europe’s red foxes and swans, the pumas of North America, Asian pandas and many more!

These beautiful, expressive illustrations of animals capture their motion and personality in a way that is truly remarkable for such stylized images. The 3D effect of the stunning geometric line and use of colour makes them truly live and breathe on the page. The colour palette is subtle but beautifully suited to both habitats and the animals we meet there. The variety of layout makes every page turn a surprise and continually engages the reader’s interest. The interplay of text and images make this a really enjoyable and memorable learning experience.

tidyTIDY illustrated and written by Emily Gravett

Brand new from the critically acclaimed Emily Gravett, comes TIDY, a hilarious, vibrantly illustrated, rhyming tale about a badger called Pete, who is slightly over-zealous in his desire for complete cleanliness. Pete likes things neat, but unfortunately his forest home is not the tidiest of dwellings. As the weather, the Seasons, not to mention the other animals, hamper Pete’s dreams of a uncluttered existence, the crafty badger hatches a plan that is bound to keep everything permanently spick and span. But when Pete goes too far and concretes over his woodland home, he begins to realise that maybe his actions have caused more harm than good. And maybe a bit of mess now and again is actually rather a positive thing?

This charming and witty story perfectly delivers its message of environmental preservation with subtlety and humour. The depth of quality in its production is outstanding; the multi-layered hole on the front cover, the double sided dust jacket and the wonderful flaps draw in and delight the reader. Lush foliage and vibrant forest colours shine through, as the palette subtly changes to reflect the seasons. Full of humour and skilful comic visual details, such as the wonderful badger-like decoration on the vacuum cleaner, this is a book to delight readers of all ages.

wolvesThe Wolves of Currumpaw illustrated and written by William Grill

1892, New Mexico. A wolfpack roams the Currumpaw Valley, preying on the cattle and evading capture by the exasperated local ranchmen. Due to his knowledge of wolf behaviour, a British naturalist by the name of Ernest Thompson Seton is employed to hunt down their notorious pack leader, King Lobo… A moving re-telling of the first short story from Ernest Thompson Seton’s 1898 classic collection, Wild Animals I Have Known, this is the second book from CILIP Kate Greenaway Medal award winner William Grill.

The large format of this book allows the reader a great visual experience, echoing the vast plains of New Mexico. The beautifully rendered dust jacket and end papers, inspired by Navajo and Hopi designs, usher the reader into this atmospheric tale. The colour palette is chosen with utmost care and the technique of sweeping pencil strokes evoke the setting and easily allow the scale of the desert to show the insignificance of man and wolf in the whole area. This book works on many levels, from the unobtrusive typography telling the story, the tactile nature of the endpaper illustrations to the synergy between illustration style and the setting of the tale. Text and images and are all carefully placed on the page, underlining the scale of the desert; whilst the movement of the wolves is so simply expressed. Grill’s style is unique, distinctive and highly creative so much so that this books works on many levels, it is a deceptively simple medium showing a depth of richness and skill that is a testament to his skill.

harryHarry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone illustrated by Jim Kay, written by J.K. Rowling

When a letter arrives for unhappy but ordinary Harry Potter, a decade-old secret is revealed to him that apparently he’s the last to know. His parents were wizards, killed by a Dark Lord’s curse when Harry was just a baby, and which he somehow survived. Leaving his unsympathetic aunt and uncle for Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry, Harry stumbles upon a sinister mystery when he finds a three-headed dog guarding a room on the third floor. Then he hears of a missing stone with astonishing powers, which could be valuable, dangerous – or both. An incredible adventure is about to begin!

An outstanding illustrated version of a modern children’s classic, ready to bring a new generation of readers into the magical world of Harry Potter. These illustrations go back to the text and lure the reader away from the familiar film images. The artist has added so much more depth and detail to bring this world to life. For example there is a whole street worth of invented detail in Diagon Alley and we have intricate scientific drawings of the various species of troll that inhabit this world. There is an astonishing range of techniques and artistry shown throughout the book in a variety of full page portraits, small vignettes, chapter headings and the glorious end papers. This visualisation enhances the text and offers the reader a whole new, deeper and authentic experience.

cuddleA Great Big Cuddle illustrated by Chris Riddell and written by Michael Rosen

Two of the biggest names in children’s publishing, Michael Rosen and Chris Riddell, come together in a new poetry collection. The poems in A Great Big Cuddle fizz off the page with sound and rhythm, energy and laughter, as Rosen captures in the most remarkable way what it means to be very, very young. A child’s world with all its details and feelings – toys and games, animals and made-up creatures, likes and dislikes – is vividly conjured up in the most memorable, playful language, and Chris Riddell has produced some his most extraordinary pictures ever to bring this world to life. It’s a book that will be enjoyed by the oldest grown-up and the youngest child – and a future classic.

This is an unusual size for a picture book, but the layout of each poem works to give the reader a different experience every time a page is turned. The poems requiring movement have that in abundance in both typography and in the illustration. The simple primary colour palette makes the illustrations bold and engaging. There is a creative use of the vignettes that really adds to the textual experience. The illustrations underline the nonsense of the poetry making this a very satisfying and distinctive experience. Two people at the height of their powers combining to make a great book for very young people.

journeyThe Journey illustrated and written by Francesca Sanna

What is it like to have to leave everything behind and travel many miles to somewhere unfamiliar and strange? A mother and her two children set out on such a journey; one filled with fear of the unknown, but also great hope. Based on her interactions with people forced to seek a new home, and told from the perspective of a young child, The Journey is full of significance for our time.

These timely and distinctive illustrations offer a deep and emotional introduction to the losses and experiences that immigrant families face. A strong sense of movement is achieved throughout, as the family journey onwards in a quest for safety. The menace of war and evil are particularly well depicted through the imposing black sea representing the approaching war, and dense black shadows that bring a real and deep darkness with them. A carefully chosen palette of colours, tones and techniques are used to great effect in the depiction of both physical and emotional landscapes. Impressive use of the endpapers is made, as they respectively introduce and then continue the story. An unusual typeface is used for the sparse, yet moving text, resembling handwriting this poignantly emphasises the personal nature of the story. This book will have a powerful impact on readers of all ages.

marvelsThe Marvels illustrated and written by Brian Selznick

In The Marvels, Selznick weaves together two seemingly unrelated stories- one in words, the other in pictures -with spellbinding synergy. The illustrated story begins in 1766 with Billy Marvel, the lone survivor of a shipwreck, and charts the adventures of his family of actors over five generations. The prose story opens in 1990 and follows Joseph, who has run away from school to an estranged uncle’s puzzling house in London, where he, along with the reader, must piece together many mysteries. Filled with mystery, vibrant characters, surprise twists, and heart-rending beauty, and featuring Selznick’s most arresting art to date, The Marvels is a moving tribute to the power of story.

This visually stunning book invites exploration from the first page. The whole production is a work of art that is outstanding on every level. Detailed cross-hatched illustrations carry the reader’s focus to the heart of characters, action and drama through a near-cinematic zooming in and panning out. There is a strong use of space and a real awareness of how different forms. come together to produce a story, creating an innovative and fully immersive experience.

tribeThere is a Tribe of Kids illustrated and written by Lane Smith

Lane Smith takes us on a colourful adventure through the natural world, following a child as he weaves through the jungle, dives under the ocean and soars into the sky. Along the way he makes friends and causes mischief with a dazzling array of creatures both large and small – but can he find a tribe of his own? Full of warmth and humour, There Is a Tribe of Kids is a playful exploration of wild childhood – of curiosity, discovery and what it means to belong.

There’s a wonderful sense of movement, animation and life in the illustrations to this book. A palette comprised of muted earth tones emphasises and extends the natural tone and themes of the book. Use of sequencing is controlled and there is an impressive synergy and balance between text and illustration. There is a warmth and wit in the play and imagination shown in the final spreads showing how the children are influenced and inspired by the world around them suggesting ideas around the way nurture and environmental factors can be formative in growth.

You can borrow these books from our libraries, so check out our catalogue to see if it’s in a library near you: http://bit.ly/1zSCJlf

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