Books for Teens for LGBT History Month 2018

To celebrate LGBT (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender) month we have put together a list of recommended titles for teen readers:2018-Badge-354-x-354-JPG-300x300

 

Read me like a book by Liz Kessler

Ashleigh Walker is in love. You know the feeling – that intense, heart-racing, all-consuming emotion that can only come with first love. It’s enough to stop her worrying about bad grades at college. Enough to distract her from her parents’ marriage troubles. There’s just one thing bothering her. Shouldn’t it be her boyfriend, Dylan, who makes her feel this way – not Miss Murray, her English teacher?

Beyond magenta : transgender teens speak out by Susan Kuklin

Author and photographer Susan Kuklin met and interviewed six transgender or gender-neutral young adults and used her considerable skills to represent them thoughtfully and respectfully before, during, and after their personal acknowledgment of gender identity. Portraits, family photographs and candid images grace the pages, augmenting the emotional and physical journey each youth has taken.

 

Freakboy by Kristin Elizabeth Clark

From the outside, Brendan Chase seems to have it pretty easy. He’s a star wrestler, a video game aficionado, and a loving boyfriend to his seemingly perfect match, Vanessa. But on the inside, Brendan struggles to understand why his body feels so wrong – why he sometimes fantasises about having long hair, soft skin, and gentle curves. Is there even a name for guys like him? Guys who sometimes want to be girls? Or is Brendan just a freak? In razor-sharp verse, Kristin Clark folds three narratives into one powerful story. Brendan trying to understand his sexual identity, Vanessa fighting to keep her and Brendan’s relationship alive, and Angel struggling to confront her demons.

 

This book is gay by   James Dawson

Former PSHCE teacher and acclaimed YA author James Dawson gives an uncensored look at sexual orientation and gender identity. Including testimonials from people across the gender and sexual spectrums, this frank, funny, fully inclusive book explores everything anyone who ever dared to wonder wants to know – from sex to politics, how to pull, stereotypes, how to come-out and more.

Two boys kissing by David Levithan

The two boys kissing are Craig and Harry. They’re hoping to set the world record for the longest kiss. They’re not a couple, but they used to be. Peter and Neil are a couple. Their kisses are different. Avery and Ryan have only just met and are trying to figure out what happens next. Cooper is alone. He’s not sure how he feels. As the marathon progresses, these boys, their friends and families evaluate the changing nature of feelings, behaviour and this crazy thing called love.

 

Out by Joanna Kenrick and illustrated by Julia Page

‘I think I’m gay’ are not the words a teenage girl wants to hear when she’s about to confess to her best friend that she fancies him. But Natalie’s got to disguise her own feelings for Will when he tells her his secret. Can she help him as he comes out to the rest of their class at school?

 

Simon vs. the Homo Sapiens Agenda by Becky Albertalli

16-year-old and not-so-openly gay Simon Spier prefers to save his drama for the school musical. But when an email falls into the wrong hands, his secret is at risk of being thrust into the spotlight. And worse still, so will the privacy of ‘Blue’, the pen name of the boy he’s been emailing. With messy dynamics emerging in Simon’s once tight-knit group of friends, and his email correspondence with Blue growing more flirtatious every day, Simon’s life suddenly becomes just a little complicated. Now Simon has to find a way to step out of his comfort zone before he’s pushed out – without alienating his friends, compromising himself, or fumbling a shot at happiness with the most confusing, adorable guy he’s never met.

 

Hero by Perry Moore

Thom Creed is used to being on his own. Even though he’s a basketball star, his school classmates keep their distance. They have picked up on something different about Thom. Plus, he can’t escape his father’s history. Hal Creed was one of the greatest superheroes of his time until a catastrophic event left him disfigured and an outcast.

The art of being normal by Lisa Williamson

David is funny and quirky and has always felt different from other people – but he also has a huge secret that only his two best friends know. Ever since he can remember, he has felt like a girl trapped in the body of a boy.

Like other girls by Claire Hennessy

Here’s what sixteen-year-old Lauren knows: she’s not like other girls. She also knows it’s problematic to say that – what’s wrong with girls? She’s even fancied some in the past – but if you were stuck in St Agnes’s, her posh all-girls school in Ireland, you’d feel like that too. Here everyone’s expected to be Perfect Young Ladies – it’s even a song in the painfully-cheesy and sexist musical they’re putting on this year, directed by Lauren’s arch-nemesis. Lauren is not like other girls, and nor is her friend Evan, who’s just come out as a trans boy – which Lauren knows she’s supposed to be cool with but still feels betrayed by. (Having had an unrequited crush on Evan for years doesn’t help, either). Why can’t everyone just be themselves without obsessing over labels? Then Lauren discovers she’s pregnant – the most girlish thing of all.

 

Our own private universe by Robin Talley

15-year-old Aki Simon has a theory. And it’s mostly about sex. No, it isn’t that kind of theory. Aki already knows she’s bisexual – even if, until now, it’s mostly been in the hypothetical sense. Aki’s theory is that she’s only got one shot at living an interesting life – and that means she’s got to stop sitting around and thinking so much. It’s time for her to actually do something. Or at least try. So when Aki and her friend Lori set off on a trip to a small Mexican town for the summer, and Aki meets Christa – slightly-older, far-more-experienced – it seems her theory is prime for the testing. But something tells her it’s not going to be that easy.

 

Fight like a girl : 50 feminists who changed the world by Laura Barcella

Feminism is a hot topic. The battle for gender equality is being fought by everybody from politicians to indie social media campaigners, celebrities to school girls. But how did we get here and who paved the way for today’s badass women? ‘Fight Like a Girl’ profiles 50 fearless women – both the historical icons and the unsung heroes – such as Mary Wollstonecraft, Frida Kahlo and Roxane Gay. Each extraordinary life story is accompanied by a stunning portrait, along with eye-opening sidebars on their hard-fought causes and iconic quotes. Be inspired by their stories, arm yourself with their knowledge, get active and ‘Fight like a girl.’

 

Release by Patrick Ness

Today will change Adam Thorn’s life. Between his religious family, unpleasant boss and his ex-boyfriend, the bindings of his world are coming undone. And way across town, a ghost has risen from the lake. Is there time for Adam to find his release?

 

 

History is all you left me by Adam Silvera

OCD-afflicted seventeen-year-old, Griffin, has just lost his first love – his best friend, ex-boyfriend and the boy he believed to be his ultimate life partner – in a drowning accident. In a desperate attempt to hold onto every last piece of the past, a broken Griffin forges a friendship with Theo’s new college boyfriend, Jackson. And Griffin will stop at nothing to learn every detail of Theo’s new college life, and ultimate death. But as the grieving pair grows closer, readers will question Griffin’s own version of the truth – both in terms of what he’s willing to hide, and what true love ultimately means.

The last days of Archie Maxwell by Annabel Pitcher

Dads leave home all the time. It’s not that unusual, really. Leon’s dad walked out. So did Mo’s. But Archie’s? Well, that’s a different story – a story that Archie must keep secret at all cost. Archie knows he should accept Dad for who he is, so he hides his turmoil until he can stand it no longer. With nowhere else to turn, he finds himself at the railway track. The track has been calling to him, promising escape, and release. The only problem is, it’s been calling to someone else too.

 

If I was your Girl by Meredith Russo

My name is Amanda. I’m 18. When you look at me, you might see that I’m pretty and popular, you might think my life is easy. But being me has never been easy – because I haven’t always been Amanda. When I was born, I was named Andrew. Now, at my new school, I finally feel like myself. But do I owe my new friends the truth about my past?

 

Lies we tell ourselves by Robin Talley

In 1959 Virginia, the lives of two girls on opposite sides of the battle for civil rights will be changed forever. Sarah Dunbar is one of the first black students to attend the previously all-white Jefferson High School. Linda Hairston is the daughter of one of the town’s most vocal opponents of school integration. She has been taught all her life that the races should be kept ‘separate but equal.’ Forced to work together on a school project, Sarah and Linda must confront harsh truths about race, power and how they really feel about one another.

 

All of the recommended titles can be borrowed from Wokingham Borough Libraries https://wokingham.spydus.co.uk or visit www.wokingham.gov.uk/libraries

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New Revision Study Guides for GCSE and A-Level

Are you or someone in your family starting to think about revising for GCSEs or A-Levels this Summer? If so, you might be interested to know that we have lots of new revision study guides available to borrow from Wokingham, Lower Earley and Woodley libraries.

We cover the Edexcel, OCR and AQA examination boards for GCSE and A-Level, with updated guides for the new Grades 9 to 1 GCSEs.

Subjects include Mathematics, English Language and Literature, Biology, Chemistry, Physics (including Combined Sciences), French, German, Spanish, Computer Science, Religious Studies, Business Studies, Geography, History, Economics and Psychology.

Titles can be reserved via the online library catalogue http://www.wokingham.gov.uk/libraries/library-services/search-renew-and-reserve-items/

Books for Children for LGBT History Month 2018

To celebrate LGBT (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender) month we have put together a alist of recommended titles for Children2018-Badge-354-x-354-JPG-300x300

 

Heather has two mummies by Lesléa Newman

Heather’s favourite number is two – she has two arms, two legs, two pets and two lovely mummies. But when Heather goes to school for the first time, someone asks her about her daddy – and Heather doesn’t have a daddy! But then the class all draw portraits of their families, and not one single drawing is the same. Heather and her classmates realise – it doesn’t matter who makes up a family, the most important thing is that all the people in it love one another very much.

 

Josh and Jaz have three mums by Hedi Argent ; illustrations by Amanda Wood

This illustrated book for children aged five to eight helps to explain the diversity and ‘difference’ of family groups, and encourages an understanding and appreciation of same sex parents

 

And Tango makes three by Justin Richardson and Peter Parnell ; illustrated by Henry Cole.

The heartwarming true story of two penguins that create a nontraditional family. At the penguin house at the Central Park Zoo, two penguins named Roy and Silo were a little bit different from the others. But their desire for a family was the same. And with the help of a kindly zookeeper, Roy and Silo got the chance to welcome a baby penguin of their very own.

 

This is my family : a first look at same-sex parents by Pat Thomas and illustrated by Lesley Harker

This text introduces children to families that have parents of the same sex. Whether a family has a mum and a dad, or two mums or two dads, this book shows that all parents love, care, and support their children in the same way.

 

The boy in the dress by David Walliams

Dennis was different. Why was he different, you ask? Well, a small clue might be in the title of this book. Charming, surprising and hilarious will touch the hearts (and funny bones) of children and adults alike.

 

The Sleeper and the Spindle by Neil Gaiman and illustrated by Chris Riddell

On the eve of her wedding, a young queen sets out to rescue a princess from an enchantment. She casts aside her fine wedding clothes, takes her chain mail and her sword and follows her brave dwarf retainers into the tunnels under the mountain towards the sleeping kingdom. This queen will decide her own future – and the princess who needs rescuing is not quite what she seems.

My princess boy: a mom’s story about a young boy who loves to dress up by Cheryl Kilodavis and illustrated by Suzanne DeSimone.

A heart-warming true story of love and acceptance A nonfiction picture book about acceptance. With words and illustrations even the youngest of children can understand, My Princess Boy tells the tale of a four-year-old boy who happily expresses his authentic self by dressing up in dresses, and enjoying traditional girl things such as jewelry and anything pink or sparkly. The book is from a mom’s point of view, sharing both good and bad observations and experiences with friends and family, at school and in shopping stores.

Introducing Teddy by Jessica Walton

Errol and his teddy, Thomas, are best friends who do everything together. Whether it’s riding a bike, playing in the tree house, having a tea party or all of the above, every day holds something fun to do together. One sunny day, Errol finds that Thomas the Teddy is sad, and Errol can’t figure out why. Then Thomas the Teddy finally tells Errol what Teddy has been afraid to say: ‘In my heart, I’ve always known that I’m a girl teddy, not a boy teddy. I wish my name was Tilly.’ And Errol says, ‘I don’t care if you’re a girl teddy or a boy teddy! What matters is that you are my friend.’ A sweet and gentle story about being true to yourself and being a good friend, Introducing Teddy can also help children understand gender identity.

Baking with dad by Aurora Cacciapuoti

When dad decides it’s baking day, be prepared for creative chaos! From choosing the recipe and sorting the ingredients, to storing the mix and baking in the oven, each moment is full of surprises! Follow this comical, culinary adventure to discover what they are baking and who will be there to eat it!

We are family by Patricia Hegarty and illustrated by Ryan Wheatcroft

All families are different – and yet in many ways the same! This book uses a gentle rhyming text to follow eight different families, celebrating their everyday differences as well as the similarities they share.

 

 

All of the recommended titles can be borrowed from Wokingham Borough Libraries https://wokingham.spydus.co.uk or visit www.wokingham.gov.uk/libraries

Books for Adults for LGBT History Month 2018

To celebrate LGBT (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender) month we have put together a list of recommended titles for adult readers:

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Oranges Are Not the Only Fruit by Jeanette Winterson
Like most people I lived for a long time with my mother and father. My father liked to watch the wrestling, my mother liked to wrestle; it didn’t matter what.” — Oranges Are Not the Only Fruit This is the story of Jeanette, adopted and brought up by her mother as one of God’s elect. Zealous and passionate, she seems destined for life as a missionary, but then she falls for one of her converts. At sixteen, Jeanette decides to leave the church, her home and her family, for the young woman she loves. Innovative, punchy and tender, Oranges Are Not the Only Fruit is a few days ride into the bizarre outposts of religious excess and human obsession.

The Hours by Michael Cunningham
The Hours is a daring and deeply affecting novel inspired by the life and work of Virginia Woolf. In 1920s London, Virginia Woolf is fighting against her rebellious spirit as she attempts to make a start on her new novel. A young wife and mother, broiling in a suburb of 1940s Los Angeles, yearns to escape and read her precious copy of Mrs Dalloway’.And Clarissa Vaughan steps out of her smart Greenwich village apartment in 1990s New York to buy flowers for a party she is hosting for a dying friend. Moving effortlessly across the decades and between England and America, this exquisite novel intertwines the stories of three unforgettable women.

Brideshead Revisited by Evelyn Waugh
Written at the end of the World War II, this novel mourns the passing of the aristocratic world which Waugh knew in his youth and recalls the sensuous pleasures denied him by the austerities of war. In so doing, it provides a study of the conflict between the demands of religion and of the flesh.

Death in Venice by Thomas Mann
Death in Venice tells the story of Gustav von Aschenbach, a successful but aging writer who follows his wanderlust to Venice in search of spiritual fulfillment that instead leads to his erotic doom.
In the decaying city, besieged by an unnamed epidemic, he becomes obsessed with an exquisite Polish boy, Tadzio. “It is a story of the voluptuousness of doom,” Mann wrote. “But the problem I had especially in mind was that of the artist’s dignity

 

Carol by Patricia Highsmith
First published in 1952 under a pseudonym, this novel was described as the first gay book with a happy ending. It is a love story about Therese, 19, and Carol, a sophisticated married woman.

The Paying Guests by Sarah Waters
It is 1922, and London is tense. Ex-servicemen are disillusioned, the out-of-work and the hungry are demanding change. And in South London, in a genteel Camberwell villa, a large silent house now bereft of brothers, husband and even servants, life is about to be transformed, as impoverished widow Mrs Wray and her spinster daughter, Frances, are obliged to take in lodgers. As passions mount and frustration gathers, no one can foresee just how far-reaching, and how devastating, the disturbances will be.

Fried Green Tomatoes at the Whistle Stop Café by Fannie Flagg
The day Idgie Threadgoode and Ruth Jamison opened the Whistle Stop Cafe, the town took a turn for the better. It was the Depression and that cafe was a home from home for many of us. You could get eggs, grits, bacon, ham, coffee and a smile for 25 cents. Ruth was just the sweetest girl you ever met. And Idgie? She was a character, all right. You never saw anyone so headstrong. But how anybody could have thought she murdered that man is beyond me. Fried Green Tomatoes at the Whistle Stop Cafe is a mouth-watering tale of love, laughter and mystery.

 

Sing You Home by Jodi Picoult
Zoe Baxter has spent ten years trying to get pregnant, and just when she’s about to get her heart’s desire, tragedy destroys her world. When Zoe allows herself to start thinking of children again, she remembers that there are still frozen embryos that she and her husband never used. But she needs his permission to use them.

The Song of Achilles by Madeline Miller

Greece in the age of heroes. Patroclus, an awkward young prince, has been exiled to the court of King Peleus and his perfect son Achilles. Despite their differences, Achilles befriends the shamed prince, and as they grow into young men skilled in the arts of war and medicine, their bond blossoms into something deeper – despite the displeasure of Achilles’s mother Thetis, a cruel sea goddess. But when word comes that Helen of Sparta has been kidnapped, Achilles must go to war in distant Troy and fulfill his destiny. Torn between love and fear for his friend, Patroclus goes with him, little knowing that the years that follow will test everything they hold dear.

Tell the Wolves I’m Home by Carol Rifka Brunt

There’s only one person who has ever truly understood 14-year-old June Elbus, and that’s her uncle, the renowned painter, Finn Weiss. Shy at school and distant from her once inseparable older sister, June can only be herself in Finn’s company; he is her godfather, confident, and best friend.

Non-Fiction

Inseparable: Desire between Women in Literature by Emma Donoghue
Love between women crops up throughout literature: from Chaucer and Shakespeare to Charlotte Bronte, Dickens, Agatha Christie, and many more. In ‘Inseparable’, Emma Donoghue examines how desire between women in literature has been portrayed, from schoolgirls and vampires to runaway wives, from cross-dressing knights to contemporary murder stories.

Proud by Gareth Thomas

The autobiography of former Welsh rugby player Gareth Thomas, who represented Wales in both rugby union and rugby league. Thomas announced publicly he was gay in 2009, making him the first openly gay professional rugby union player.

Good as You by Paul Flynn

‘Good As You’ is the 30 year history of British gay culture – from the identification of the HIV virus in 1984, through Manchester’s self-selection as Britain’s gay capital, to Eastenders’ Colin and Barry’s first primetime televised gay kiss and the real-time romance of Elton John and David Furnish’s eventual marriage. Including candid interviews from major protagonists such as Kylie, Russell T. Davies and Holly Johnson, as well as the relative unknowns crucial to the gay community, Flynn charts the fight for equality both front of stage and in the wings.

Pride and Joy by Sarah and Rachel Hagger-Holt

Pride and Joy‘ is a practical, positive guide for lesbian, gay, bi and trans parents. It draws on experiences and advice from a diverse range of LGBT parents and their children.

Queer City by Peter Ackroyd

In ‘Queer City‘, Peter Ackroyd looks at London in a whole new way – through the story of its gay population. In Roman Londinium the city was dotted with lupanaria (‘wolf dens’ or public pleasure houses), fornices (brothels) and thermiae (hot baths). Then came the Emperor Constantine, with his bishops, monks and missionaries. And so began an endless loop of alternating permissiveness and censure. Ackroyd takes us right into the hidden history of the city; from the notorious Normans to the frenzy of executions for sodomy in the early 19th century. He journeys through the coffee bars of sixties Soho to Gay Liberation, disco music and the horror of AIDS.

The Oldest Gay in the Village by George Montague

Born in 1923, George Montague has seen many changes in his lifetime, few greater than the attitude towards being gay – attitudes that saw him criminalised for the sin of loving another man. This charming, funny book is a unique social history from a truly remarkable man.

Becoming Nicole by Amy Ellis Nut

This is the inspiring true story of a transgender girl, her identical twin brother, and an ordinary American family’s extraordinary journey to understand, nurture, and celebrate the uniqueness in us all.

Philomena by Martin Sixsmith

Philomena‘ is the tale of a mother and a son whose lives were scarred by the forces of hypocrisy on both sides of the Atlantic and of the secrets they were forced to keep. A compelling narrative of human love and loss, Martin Sixsmith’s moving account is both heartbreaking yet ultimately redemptive.

Trans Britain edited by Christine Burns

Over the last five years, transgender people have seemed to burst into the public eye. From our television screens to the ballot box, transgender had suddenly become part of the zeitgeist. This apparently overnight emergence, though, is just the latest stage in a long and varied history. The renown of Paris Lees and Hari Nef has its roots in the efforts of those who fought for equality before them, but were met with apathy – and often outright hostility – from mainstream society. ‘Trans Britain‘ chronicles this journey in the words of those who were there to witness a once invisible community grow into the powerful movement we recognise today: activists, film-makers, parents, broadcasters, an actress, a rock musician and a priest, among many others.

 

All of the recommended titles can be borrowed from Wokingham Borough Libraries https://wokingham.spydus.co.uk or visit http://www.wokingham.gov.uk/libraries

Children’s Book Recommendations to support the 1918 Representation of the People Act

2018 marks 100 years since Parliament passed a law which allowed some women, and all men, to vote for the first time: the 1918 Representation of the People Act.

Why not try some of these amazing books that you can borrow from our libraries:

Things a bright girl can do by Sally Nichollsthings a bright girl can do

Evelyn is 17, and though she is rich and clever, she may never be allowed to follow her older brother to university. Enraged that she is expected to marry her childhood sweetheart rather than be educated, she joins the Suffragettes, and vows to pay the ultimate price for women’s freedom. May is 15, and already sworn to the cause, though she and her fellow Suffragists refuse violence. When she meets Nell, a girl who’s grown up in hardship, she sees a kindred spirit. Together and in love, the two girls start to dream of a world where all kinds of women have their place. But the fight for freedom will challenge Evelyn, May and Nell more than they ever could believe. As war looms, just how much are they willing to sacrifice?

 

The princess and the suffragette by  Holly Webb.

It is 1913, nine years after the end of A Little Princess saw Sara Crewe escape Miss Minchin’s orphanage. Lottie, the smallest girl from the original story, learns about the Suffragette movement from Sara, who returns to visit from time to time. Soon Lottie finds herself sneaking out of the orphanage to attend a demonstration, in defiance of her cold, distant father. A father who has a secret to hide about her own missing mother… It’s a story about lost mothers turning up in unexpected situations, the power of friendship and female empowerment.

 

Until we win by Linda Newberry Until we win

100 years ago, women didn’t have the right to vote. When Lizzy Frost becomes involved with the fledgling Suffragette movement, it expands her horizons in ways she never could have imagined. From time spent in prison for the cause to new relationships with fellow campaigners, Lizzy’s struggle for votes for women sets her heart on fire.

 

Rebel voices by Louise Kay Stewart

Campaigning through wars and facism, demanding their vote via protests, rallies and even imprisonment, global women’s suffrage took more than a century to achieve and is still ongoing today. Tracing its history from New Zealand at the end of the 19th century, follow this empowering movement as it spread from Oceania to Europe and the Americas, then Africa and Asia up to the present day.

Women win the vote : 6 February 1918 by Brian Williams.Women Win the Vote

On 6 February 1918, women in Britain were awarded the right to vote in a general election for the first time. Many of these women were suffragettes, who had fought a long, hard battle for the right to vote.

Fantastically great women who changed the world by Kate Pankhurstgreat women

Discover fascinating facts about some of the most amazing women who changed the world. Fly through the sky with the incredible explorer Amelia Earhart, read all about the wonderful adventures of Mary Seacole and many more inspiring women.

 

All of the recommended titles can be borrowed from Wokingham Borough Libraries https://wokingham.spydus.co.uk  or visit www.wokingham.gov.uk/libraries

 

Empathy Day Book Recommendations

Empathy Day Book Recommendations from Empathy Lab

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 Teachers and parents are increasingly concerned about the potentially empathy draining effect of social media on children and the new pressures caused by societal divisions.   To combat this Empathy Lab are delighted to announce our brand new 2018 Empathy Book Collection, specially selected by an expert panel.  Featuring picture books, powerful stories, poetry, and graphic novels, this collection for children aged 4 -11 years  will be an excellent resource to build their empathy skills. Download the 2018 Read for Empathy Guide here.

 Use these books in your classrooms and libraries in the run up to Empathy Day on 12th June 2018 and way beyond.

 All of the texts offer powerful insights into other people’s feelings and will help young people develop an understanding of a variety of different life experiences and issues that people face.  We hope they will inspire children to turn feelings of empathy into action – in their homes, schools and communities.

 All books are available to borrow from Wokingham Borough Libraries – http://www.wokingham.gov.uk/libraries/library-services/search-renew-and-reserve-items/

If any schools would like to do a Empathy book visit to your local library then contact above please contact Elizabeth McDonald on (0118) 974 3709 or e-mail elizabeth.mcdonald@wokingham.gov.uk

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Winter Reading Challenge for Young People

jpg bannerWinter Reading Challenge for Young People

This fun challenge ran over the festive season for young people in Wokingham Borough Libraries.

Everyone was challenged to read three books and write a book review.

171 young people entered and received a certificate on completing their challenge.

The prize draw winners for this year are:

 Phoebe, Age 9 Wokingham Library

Imogen Age 6 Spencers Wood Library

Brodie, Age 6 Finchampstead Library

Keshini, Age 7 Woodley Library

Ayushi, Age 10 Lower Earley Library

Matthew, Age 14 Wokingham Library

Krish, Age 6 Lower Earley Library

Baseem, Age 15 Winnersh Library

Molly, Age 7 Winnersh Library

Aya, Age 8 Wargrave Library

Marcell, Age 6 Twyford Wood

Xin Ling, Age 8 Maiden Erlegh Library

 

All of the prize draw winners will receive a book filled goody bag.

 

Well done to everyone who took part and enjoyed ready a wide range of amazing books from their local library.

 

Holocaust Memorial Day 2018 Books for Teens

In Support of Holocaust Memorial Day January 27, 2018 all Wokingham Borough Libraries will have materials on display along with information booklets and books to borrow from the Holocaust Memorial Day Trust.      

 Booklists have been created and a wealth of information is available to use on the Holocaust Memorial Day Trust website, http://hmd.org.uk/page/resources-your-activity

 

Suggested Book Titles for Teens

Refugee Boy by Benjamin Zephaniah

Alem’s Father is Ethiopian and his mother is Eritrean.  Their countries are at war and Alem is not safe. He is not welcome in Ethiopia because he has Eritrean blood. He cannot live in Eritrea because his Father is from Ethiopia.  His Father takes him to a place of safety but staying there will not be easy.  Alem meets many challenges, which he faces with courage.  Circumstances beyond his control force him to live away from the land of his birth.  He has to pick up the pieces and start again.  As he struggles to come to terms with all that has happened to his loved ones there are some people prepared to help him and some who do their best to make life as difficult as possible. – See more at: http://hmd.org.uk/resources/books-for-youngs/refugee-boy-benjamin-zephaniah#sthash.Q0HBkkhC.dpuf

 

A song for summer by Eva Ibbotson

A Song for Summer will appeal to students aged 14 and above.  It introduces readers to a cast of colourful characters who work and study at a drama, dance and music school in Austria.  The Nazis are rising to power in neighbouring Germany when Ellen, the daughter of a former suffragette, travels from England to take a post at the school.  There she meets Marek, who works as the school’s gardener and odd job man.  When Marek disappears Ellen discovers that he is keeping many things secret.  On his return she is drawn into a rescue mission. Isaac, Marek’s friend, a Jewish musician, is on the run and the Nazis are drawing near. – See more at: http://hmd.org.uk/resources/books-for-youngs/song-summer-eva-ibbotson#sthash.7ssfA4Nc.dpuf

 

Kommandant’s Girl by Pam Jenoff

Emma Bau has been married to Jacob for six weeks but the Jewish newlyweds are torn apart when Poland is invaded.  Jacob is a member of the Resistance and he has to flee from

Krakow, leaving his young wife behind.  Emma must struggle to survive by taking on a new identity.  As Anna Lipowski, a ‘gentile orphan girl newly arrived from Gdansk’ she finds herself in a unique position and is able to gather intelligence for the Jewish Resistance but in order to do this she is forced to make difficult choices which have serious consequences for her friends and family.

The book is not recommended for younger students but works well with AS, A2 and Highers candidates, as well as within general discussion groups at post-16 levels.

– See more at: http://hmd.org.uk/resources/books-for-youngs/kommandant%E2%80%99s-girl-pam-jenoff#sthash.VQCWxpL3.dpuf

 

Noughts and Crosses by Malorie Blackman

Set in an alternative reality to the current day, Malorie Blackman’s Noughts and Crosses books (there are currently four of them in the series) posits a world divided into two: crosses, the ruling black people, and noughts, white people. Malorie Blackman cleverly finds things we take for granted in our society and turns them on their head, forcing the reader to challenge their preconceptions of the world.

The first book in the series, Noughts and Crosses, establishes the central characters, notably Sephy Haley, a cross, and Callum McGregor, a nought. It is clear from the outset that their relationship will be pivotal to the plot: noughts and crosses do not usually mix and their friendship is discouraged by both their families. The book is very compelling and ends leaving the reader wanting to dash straight into the next book!

– See more at: http://hmd.org.uk/resources/books-for-youngs/noughts-and-crosses-%E2%80%93-malorie-blackman#sthash.10dllC2s.dpuf

 

 

 Tales from the Secret Annexe by Anne Frank

Tales from the Secret Annexe is a collection of short stories and fictional accounts which were found amongst the papers and Diary of Anne Frank after the discovery and arrest of Anne and her family in Holland in August 1944.   – See more at: http://hmd.org.uk/resources/books-for-youngs/tales-secret-annexe-anne-frank#sthash.3Tbo3WYs.dpuf

 

 

The Diary Of A Young Girl by Anne Frank

Anne Frank was born in Germany on 12 June 1929.  She moved with her family to Amsterdam in 1933 when the Nazis came to power in Germany.  Anne and her family were trapped in The Netherlands when the Nazi invasion began in 1940.  Anne began to keep a personal diary on her thirteenth birthday.  She wrote ‘I hope I will be able to confide everything to you, as I have never been able to confide in anyone, and I hope you will be a great source of comfort and support’.  In July 1942 the Frank family and four other people went into hiding in a secret annex. Anne is perhaps the most famous victim of the Holocaust but as an ordinary Jewish teenager she represents the millions who died because of one group’s hatred of another.

– See more at: http://hmd.org.uk/resources/books-for-youngs/diary-young-girl-anne-frank#sthash.VvZp2ucu.dpuf

 

The English German Girl by Jake Wallis Simons

Rosa Klein is a young Jewish girl growing up in Berlin in the 1930s.  Her father, Otto, is a successful doctor and her brother and sister enjoy going to school and playing.

The story begins as the Nazis start to ban Jews from certain professions. Otto finds his patients being taken away from him and his ability to practice diminished, until he is banned from practicing medicine at all.  We see the family start to disintegrate as each member becomes increasingly forced out of society.  Heinrich, Rosa’s older brother, becomes involved in the young Jewish group Maccabi Hatzair and violent clashes with the Nazi Youth leave his parents scared for his safety. – See more at: http://hmd.org.uk/resources/books-for-youngs/english-german-girl-jake-wallis-simons#sthash.WrZ88zzV.dpuf

 

The Search by     Eric Heuvel, Ruud Van Der Rol and Lies Schippers

The Search is a graphic novel, translated from the Dutch original.  It has proved popular with teenage readers as it moves at a dramatic pace.  Daniel’s Gran, Esther, visits the Dutch farm where she was hidden from the Nazis.  She hopes to discover what happened to the other people she once knew, those who helped her escape and those who were also in hiding.  She knows that her parents were murdered in Auschwitz but nothing else.  Her grandson uses the internet to track down an old friend and other histories emerge.  Esther talks to her friend Helena and Helena remembers a book of pictures.

If your students find this book helpful a parallel text by the same team A Family Secret, tells stories of the same period through the eyes of Helena, Esther’s friend. Both books introduce students to difficult issues, such as discrimination, death camps, collaboration with the Nazis and the actions and choices made by individual people.

– See more at: http://hmd.org.uk/resources/books-for-youngs/search-eric-heuvel-ruud-van-der-rol-and-lies-schippers#sthash.8s0LinTK.dpuf

 

The Earth is singing by Vanessa Curtis

My name is Hanna. I am 15. I am Latvian. I live with my mother and grandmother. My father is missing, taken by the Russians. I have a boyfriend and I’m training to be a dancer. But none of that is important any more. Because the Nazis have arrived, and I am a Jew. And as far as they are concerned, that is all that matters. This is my story.

 

No Stars at the Circus by Mary Flynn

‘No Stars at the Circus’ is the beautifully told story of 10-year-old Jonas Alber, as written in his notebooks. Jonas lives in hiding in the Professor’s house during the six months following the round-up of Jews in Paris on 16 July 1942. He spends his days reading about his favourite subjects and also writes about his present life in the attic, as well as the past, in which the circumstances of his rescue are revealed. He writes about his friends at the circus and the family he greatly misses. Unaware of the atrocities happening around him and throughout Europe, Jonas hears that his parents have gone off ‘to work’ and is worried about his little sister, Nadia, who is deaf – so worried that one day he steps outside in the hope of finding out where she is.

 

All of the recommended titles can be borrowed from Wokingham Borough Libraries https://wokingham.spydus.co.uk   or visit http://www.wokingham.gov.uk/libraries

 

 

Holocaust Memorial Day 2018 Books for Children

In Support of Holocaust Memorial Day January 27, 2017 all Wokingham Borough Libraries will have materials on display along with information booklets and books to borrow from the Holocaust Memorial Day Trust.      

 Booklists have been created and a wealth of information is available to use on the Holocaust Memorial Day Trust website, http://hmd.org.uk/page/resources-your-activity

 

Suggested Book Titles for Children aged 5 to 8

And Tango makes three by Justin Richardson and Peter Parnell

And Tango Makes Three is a true story for primary students about two penguins called Roy and Silo.  They lived with lots of other penguins in a special enclosure in Central Park Zoo, New York.  Roy and Silo were both boys.  They played together, swam together and built a nest together.  When other penguin couples hatched eggs and raised chicks, Roy and Silo placed an egg-shaped rock in their nest and kept it warm.  One day the penguin keeper noticed what they were doing and placed a real egg in their nest.  Roy and Silo care for the egg and soon baby Tango completes their penguin family.   – See more at: http://hmd.org.uk/resources/books-for-youngs/and-tango-makes-three-justin-richardson-and-peter-parnell#sthash.P7WXVvPR.dpuf

Susan Laughs by Jeanne Wilson and Tony Ross

This is a picture book for foundation and key stage one students. It is a happy book for children inviting them to share a day in the life of Susan.  There is very little text, sometimes only two words to a page.  We read that Susan laughs, she splashes, she swings on her swing.  There are lots of pictures of Susan enjoying life with her family and friends.  Young children will enjoy sharing her laughter.  The final sentence is ‘This is Susan through and through, just like me and just like you.’  On the last page is a picture of laughing Susan sitting in her wheelchair. As the story is so simple there is no need for formal questions for discussion.  Teachers are encouraged to use the book with young children to focus on the joy of being an individual child. An important part of HMD’s 21st century message is recognising differences and valuing individual people. See more at: http://hmd.org.uk/resources/books-for-youngs/susan-laughs-jeanne-wilson-and-tony-ross#sthash.nQMoSdqs.dpuf

The Colour of Home – Mary Hoffman and Karin Littlewood

Hassan joins a new school.  He is very sad and does not say very much. He paints a picture of his pet cat and his old house.  Slowly, through the picture, his teacher and classmates begin to understand his story and why he must try to build a new life a long way fromhome.  Some things to think about with primary students. – See more at: http://hmd.org.uk/resources/books-for-youngs/colour-home-mary-hoffman-and-karin-littlewood#sthash.mPvDQKrm.dpuf

Suggested Book Titles for Children aged 9 to 12 years old

Put Out the Light by Terry Deary

The book is split between two groups of children, Sally and Billy Thomas in Sheffield, England and Manfred and Hansl in Dachau, Germany during World War Two.  In England, Sally and Billy are investigating the mysterious case of the ‘Blackout Burglar’ who is stealing money whilst the neighbourhood seeks refuge in the community shelters.  Telling the story from their perspective, we find out about tiny rations of meat, the black market and the problems caused by ‘phony’ air raid warnings. Manfred’s story begins in Dachau.  His class have been given the opportunity to talk to his brother Ernst, a member of the Luftwaffe, and they ask him what it is like to fly a plane.  The book helps us to imagine what life might have been like at the beginning of the war in both countries for children, as well as being a thrilling adventure tale.

– See more at: http://hmd.org.uk/resources/books-for-youngs/put-out-light-terry-deary#sthash.Fu3DX8VX.dpuf

The Boy In The Striped Pyjamas by John Boyne

Bruno is unhappy when his Father is given an important new posting far away from Berlin.  It means that he will have to move from his familiar, comfortable home and part from his friends.  At nine years old, Bruno, like most German children, is unaware of the atrocities being committed by the Nazis.  All he knows is that his father works for a person Bruno thinks is called ‘The Fury’.  The new family home is a grim place.  There are no young people to join in Bruno’s games and he is not encouraged to ask questions.  Bruno is lonely.  Then, by chance, he meets Shmuel, a boy who shares his birthday but lives in shadow, on the other side of a barbed wire fence. – See more at: http://hmd.org.uk/resources/books-for-youngs/boy-striped-pyjamas-john-boyne#sthash.4qnc3wf5.dpuf

The Silver Sword – Ian Serraillier

Ian Serraillier began to write The Silver Sword in 1951, a mere six years after the end of World War Two.  It took five years to research and complete.  Although the characters Serraillier brought to life were fictitious, the story was created from historical fact and the young heroes Ruth, Edek, Bronia and Jan were based on real children found in records compiled by the Red Cross.  The Silver Sword is the story of four Polish siblings and their experience of the war and its aftermath.  When their father, the head teacher of a Polish primary school, turned a portrait of Hitler to the wall, the Nazis found out and the family was thrown into a nightmare scenario.  With the arrest of both parents Ruth, Edek and Bronia face great hardship and struggle to survive in the chaos of Nazi occupied Warsaw.  Then they meet Jan, a streetwise boy whose most precious possession is a silver paperknife in the shape of a sword; a paperknife which once belonged to their father.  With this silver sword as a talisman of hope the four young people set out on a journey from Poland to Switzerland in an attempt to meet up with their missing parents. – See more at: http://hmd.org.uk/resources/books-for-youngs/silver-sword-ian-serraillier#sthash.MPwgdKvo.dpuf

All of the recommended titles can be borrowed from Wokingham Borough Libraries https://wokingham.spydus.co.uk or visit www.wokingham.gov.uk/libraries

Holocaust Memorial Day 2018 Books for Adults

In Support of Holocaust Memorial Day January 27, 2018 all Wokingham Borough Libraries will have materials on display along with information booklets and books to borrow from the Holocaust Memorial Day Trust.      

 Booklists have been created and a wealth of information is available to use on the Holocaust Memorial Day Trust website, http://hmd.org.uk/page/resources-your-activity

Suggested Book Titles for Adults

 A Lucky Child by Thomas Buergenthal

A Lucky Child is the memoir of Thomas Buergenthal, a survivor of Kielce ghetto and both Auschwitz and Sachsenhausen Concentration Camps.  The story tells of a happy childhood and the vibrant parents who had to flee their peaceful life in Lubochna, Czechoslovakia. .  However, the story he tells is thoughtful, understated and very powerful.  His amazing strength at the age of 10 when he was finally separated from both of his parents in Auschwitz resonates throughout the book.  When, in 1945 he escapes from the deserted Sachsenhausen, the account takes an unexpected turn as we learn how he spent time in the company of the Polish army.  He later became a minor celebrity whilst in an orphanage, as it was so unusual for a child to have survived Auschwitz.  In these early post-war days, he desperately tries to ignore the likelihood that his mother and father are dead.  However, he is reunited with his mother in 1946, and we learn her story too. – See more at: http://hmd.org.uk/resources/books-for-adults/lucky-child-thomas-buergmenthal#sthash.tHGIF7fg.dpuf

If this is a Man by Primo Levi

If This is a Man is Primo Levi’s memoir of his experiences in the Nazi concentration camp, Auschwitz III.  Between 1944 and 1945 Levi spent 11 months as a prisoner in the camp where conditions were so brutal that life expectancy was only three months for new prisoners.  If This is a Man recounts not only the author’s extraordinary survival of Auschwitz, but the reasons behind the inhumanity of the Nazi concentration camp system. – See more at: http://hmd.org.uk/resources/books-for-adults/if-man-primo-levi-0#sthash.oTALdPrP.dpuf

Schindler’s Ark by Thomas Keneally

Schindler’s Ark tells the true story of Oskar Schindler, a Nazi Party member and factory owner, who saved over 1000 Jews from certain death. While the story is true the book is written as a novel.

The book also charts the story of the creation and liquidation of the ghetto in Krakow.  The book won the Booker Prize in 1982 and was made into the Academy Award winning film Schindler’s List by Steven Spielberg in 1993.

– See more at: http://hmd.org.uk/resources/books-for-adults/schindler%E2%80%99s-ark-thomas-keneally#sthash.94PRTjOo.dpuf

Suite Francaise by Irene Nemirovsky

Suite Francaise consists of the first two sections an uncompleted five-part novel examining life after the German occupation of France in 1940.  The novel was written as the events portrayed were actually unfolding and reflects the experiences of Irène Némirovsky and her family. – See more at: http://hmd.org.uk/resources/books-for-adults/suite-francaise-irene-nemirovsky#sthash.KqpWPxKA.dpuf

The Book Thief-Marcus Zusak

The Book Thief tells the story of Liesel Meminger, a nine-year old girl fostered by a family on Himmel Street, Molching, Germany in the late 1930s.  Liesel’s story includes her obsession with reading, her theft of books and the impact of the Second World War and anti-Jewish actions on the people of Himmel Street and is told to us by Death himself. – See more at: http://hmd.org.uk/resources/books-for-adults/book-thief-markus-zusak#sthash.qCXFdbYh.dpuf

The Children of Freedom by Marc Levy

The Children of Freedom is written from the perspective of 18 year old Jeannot who has, along with his younger brother, found refuge from Nazi persecution in Toulouse in 1942.  The brothers join the 35th Brigade – a group of young foreigners who fight back against their oppressors. Based on true accounts from the Resistance, including that of the author’s father, the book follows the stories of members of the 35th Brigade and looks at those who resisted – in small or large ways – the hatred of the Nazi regime. – See more at: http://hmd.org.uk/resources/books-for-adults/children-freedom-mark-levy#sthash.9tYLbu8j.dpuf

The OtherSchindlers by Agnes Grunwald Spier

In The Other Schindlers, Agnes Grunwald-Spier explores the motivation of those who rescued, hid, saved or assisted Jews in the Holocaust.  She explores the moral choices made by rescuers and asks us to consider the moral choices we make today. – See more at: http://hmd.org.uk/resources/books-for-adults/other-schindlers-agnes-grunwald-spier#sthash.lI7xWNGY.dpuf

Alone in Berlin-Hans Fallada

Alone in Berlin is based on a true story.  Otto and Anna Quangel’s son has died whilst serving with the German Army.  In a moment of anger, Anna blames Otto and ‘his Fuhrer’.  Otto is offended and decides to resist the Nazi regime in his own unique way – writing and dropping anti-Nazi postcards.  The novel is an interesting look into the fear of ordinary Germans, how many people were made into criminals even though they were living their ordinary lives.  The story also follows the Quangels as they go to jail and their subsequent tria

– See more at: http://hmd.org.uk/resources/books-for-adults/alone-berlin-hans-fallada#sthash.8V8UfI4x.dpuf

Far to Go by Alison Pick

Fiercely patriotic secular Jew, Pavel Bauer, is helpless to prevent his world from unravelling when the Nazis invade Sudetenland, Czechoslovakia in 1939.  As the Czech government falls – a system he had great respect for – and then his business partners and neighbours all turn their back on Pavel and his family, only their adoring and dependant governess Marta remains loyal.  This book explores the Bauers’ heartbreaking struggle between doing what is right and acting to save themselves.  It shows how decisions born of fear, love and principle can have unimaginable consequences in wartime.  The reader feels the Bauers’ desperation on finally grasping the true enormity of the Nazi campaign and its destructive consequences for their family and particularly for their son Pepik.   – See more at: http://hmd.org.uk/resources/books-for-adults/far-go-alison-pick#sthash.129kJ3Gc.dpuf

My Enemy’s Cradle by Sara Young

Polish born Cyrla has been sent to live with her Aunt, Uncle and Cousin in Holland by her Jewish father in 1939.  Her family keep the secret of her heritage whilst the German Army occupy Holland and Cyrla lives in hiding, afraid that her neighbours suspect her.  Carrying the child of a German soldier, Cyrla’s cousin, Anneke is destined to move to a maternity home in Germany which houses the Lebensborn breeding programme.  Anneke’s death leaves Cyrla facing a dilemma – should she face her Uncle and his growing resentment, or should she take Anneke’s place at the maternity home? – See more at: http://hmd.org.uk/resources/books-for-adults/my-enemy%E2%80%99s-cradle-sara-young#sthash.C6dZWiIA.dpuf

Tears of the Desert by Halima Bashir with Damien Lewis

Tears of the Desert is the memoir by Halima Bashir, a survivor of the Genocide in Darfur.  In this book she talks about growing up in a village in Darfur, about the persecution of her tribe – the Zaghawa tribes by the Arab Sudanese government.  She speaks about her triumph of training to be a medical doctor in Khartoum and the escalation of violence and the use of rape and torture during the ongoing genocide, and her fight to find asylum in the UK.

The Cellist of Sarajevo by Steven Galloway

The Cellist of Sarajevo is a novel which follows the lives of three inhabitants of Sarajevo during the Siege of Sarajevo which lasted from April 1992 to February 1996. The story is set during a brief period when a cellist plays in the street in remembrance of those killed in a mortar attack on a bread queue. The novel follows the lives of Kenan, who crosses the city to find water for his family; Dragan, who has become isolated from his friends and Arrow, a counter-sniper protecting residents from snipers on the hills surrounding the city. – See more at: http://hmd.org.uk/resources/books-for-adults/cellist-sarajevo-steven-galloway#sthash.pv29Q9WD.dpuf

The Pianist by Wladyslaw Szpilman

Wladyslaw Szpilman was born in 1911 in Sosnowiec in Poland.  He studied the piano and composition as a young man in Warsaw and Berlin.  On 1 April 1935 he joined Polish Radio, where he worked as a pianist performing classical and jazz music, until the German invasion of Poland reached Warsaw in autumn 1939 and Polish Radio was forced off the air.

Szpilman and his family were forced to move to the Warsaw Ghetto where he continued to play piano in cafes and bars. Szpilman survived with the help of friends and a German captain, Wilm Hosenfeld.  His family was murdered at Treblinka.  After the War Szpilman returned to Polish Radio and his music career and died in Warsaw in July 2000 at the age of 88.

– See more at: http://hmd.org.uk/resources/books-for-adults/pianist-wladyslaw-szpilman#sthash.DVzHvRv1.dpuf