CILIP Carnegie Medal 2017 winner announced next week, have you read the shortlist?

CILIP Carnegie Medal 2017 shortlist available to borrow from Wokingham Borough Libraries

The Carnegie Medal, awarded annually to the writer of an outstanding book for children, was established in 1936 in memory of the Scottish-born philanthropist, Andrew Carnegie (1835-1919). A self-made industrialist who made his fortune in steel in the USA, Carnegie’s experience of using a library as a child led him to resolve that “If ever wealth came to me that it should be used to establish free libraries.” He set up more than 2,800 libraries across the English speaking world and by the time of his death over half the library authorities in Great Britain had Carnegie libraries.

CILIP Carnegie Medal 2017 shortlist

sputnikSputnik’s Guide to Life on Earth by Frank Cottrell Boyce

Prez doesn’t talk anymore. He didn’t talk in The Temporary, where he was taken when his granddad started behaving oddly. He didn’t talk when The Family came, to take him to live on their farm in Dumfries for the summer. He is very good at listening though, which proves useful when a small, extremely talkative, mind-reading alien named Sputnik, arrives on The Family’s doorstep. Sputnik is on a mission; he needs Prez to show him ten reasons why Earth is worth saving, otherwise it will be shrunk to the size of a golf ball. Prez has no idea what to do – he can’t ask for help, because he doesn’t talk, and The Family also seem to think Sputnik is a small, yappy dog. Time is running out – how can Prez show Sputnik all the Wond

Wonderfully witty and wise this has the author’s trademark perfect blend of humour and pathos with realistic human characters existing within a tightly plotted, fantastically inventive and original adventure. There is a very satisfying complexity of ideas which make the reader think as well as laugh. This writer is particularly skilled at using fantasy to say something about the world we live in and how we relate to each other and it is the relationships which really matter. That between Prez and his grandfather with dementia is particularly well drawn and the ending of this uplifting story is both touching and credible.

boneThe Bone Sparrow by Zana Fraillon

Born in a refugee camp, all Subhi knows of the world is that he’s at least 19 fence diamonds high, the nice Jackets never stay long, and at night he dreams that the sea finds its way to his tent, bringing with it unusual treasures. And one day it brings him Jimmie. Carrying a notebook that she’s unable to read and wearing a sparrow made out of bone around her neck – both talismans of her family’s past and the mother she’s lost – Jimmie strikes up an unlikely friendship with Subhi beyond the fence. As he reads aloud the tale of how Jimmie’s family came to be, both children discover the importance of their own stories in writing their futures.

Simply and innocently told from a child’s perspective this important and timely novel brings to life the risks people are willing to take to make their voices heard and the resilience of the human spirit. Subhi’s hauntingly evocative descriptions of life in the camp deftly capture the claustrophobic feel of the camp, whilst his vivid imagination and love of stories provide a much needed escape from the awful reality of his situation. The plot is skilfully executed, blending together the two different narratives of the main characters, allowing both to influence the other’s life and propelling the action forward. Finally, the credible and consistent ending offers hope, but no easy happy ending.

smellThe Smell of Other People’s Houses by Bonnie-Sue Hitchcock

Alaska, 1970: growing up here is like nowhere else. Ruth wants to be remembered by her grieving mother. Dora wishes she was invisible to her abusive father. Alyce is staying at home to please her parents. Hank is running away for the sake of his brothers. Four very different lives are about to become entangled in these intertwining stories of love, tragedy, wild luck, and salvation. Because if we don’t save each other, how can we begin to save ourselves?

Not a word is wasted in these lyrical stories of family, romance, tragedy good fortune and redemption. Short chapters with alternating points of view immerse readers into multiple storylines where there is a tonal balance between a sense of urgency and great reflection. The four protagonists are subtly and so convincingly developed it is difficult to imagine they are not real people. The author has succeeded in creating a thoroughly convincing world.

starsThe Stars at Oktober Bend by Glenda Millard

Alice is 15, with hair as red as fire and skin as pale as bone, but something inside her is broken. She has a brain injury, the result of an assault. Manny was once a child soldier. He is 16 and has lost all his family. Alice is reaching out to express herself through her beautiful-broken words, and Manny is running to escape his past. When Manny and Alice meet they find the beginnings of love and healing. The Stars at Oktober Bend is a powerful story about the strength of the human spirit.

Told in their distinctive and memorable narrative voices this is a wonderfully evocative tale of two damaged young people who find redemption and hope in their love for each other. The author’s use of poetry as a way for Alice to convey her innermost feelings and to reach out to the world around her, works extraordinarily well and the poems are simple and beautiful. The lyrical, outstanding writing throughout develops strong characterization and a vivid sense of place, as their tragic stories gradually unfold; building to a dramatic climax that brings each strand of the novel together in an intensely satisfying way.

railRailhead by Philip Reeve

Zen Starling is a petty thief. A nobody. Destined to ride the rails to nowhere special. That is until Raven, a strange and mysterious figure, enlists him for one small job. One small job that might just bring everything in this galaxy, and the next, to the end of the line.

The novel is difficult to characterise being a mix of sci-fi, fantasy, romance and thriller. A whole world is built through very imaginative use of language which underpins a complex but well-constructed plot. A plot that is kept light, inventive and original, engaging and fast-paced throughout with clever use of humour and wit. The characters are easy to relate to; due to the realistic and interesting way they are portrayed, even minor characters are rounded and engaging. Through exploration of some of the non-human characters there is an exploration of what it is to be human whilst also exploring quite harsh criticisms of society in subtle ways. This is an engaging, emotionally satisfying read, using exciting language to draw the reader in.

beckBeck by Mal Peet with Meg Rosoff

The final novel from Carnegie Medal-winning author Mal Peet is a sweeping coming-of-age adventure, with all the characteristic beauty and strength of his prose. Born from a one-off liaison between a poor young woman and an African soldier in the 1900s, Beck is soon orphaned and sent to the Catholic Brothers in Canada. Shipped to work on a farm, his escape takes him across the continent in a search for belonging. Enduring abuse and many hardships, Beck has times of comfort and encouragement, eventually finding Grace, the woman with whom he can finally forge his life and shape his destiny as a young man. A picaresque novel set during the Depression as experienced by a young black man, it depicts great pain but has an uplifting and inspiring conclusion.

Gripping from start to finish, the writing in Beck is flawless, successfully balancing graphic cruelty with a gradual softening of tone as both the lead character and the story develop and grow. Beck himself, is witty, colloquial and utterly believable and heads up a cast of richly drawn, well rounded characters. This is a story that stays with readers reminding them that in spite of discrimination and hardship, there can be love, goodness and hope in the world.

saltSalt to the Sea by Ruta Sepetys

It’s early 1945 and a group of people trek across Germany, bound together by their desperation to reach the ship that can take them away from the war-ravaged land. Four young people, each haunted by their own dark secret, narrate their unforgettable stories. They converge in a desperate attempt to board an overcrowded ship in a Baltic port, which is tragically then sunk by a torpedo. Based on a true story, the incident was the worst maritime tragedy ever.

Mood is perfectly handled throughout this novel as we follow the characters, first through feelings of weariness as the journey towards the port, to anxiety at the prospect of not gaining a ticket to board, to sickness and overcrowding once on-board and, finally, to both desperation and hope in a traumatic conclusion. The structure of the book works exceptionally well as short chapters tell the interwoven stories and slowly reveal the secrets of our four distinctive narrators. Engaging, interesting and, at times, terrifying characters abound as historical events are brought to life through their collective stories. This is a haunting and beautiful novel that breathes life into one of World War II’s most terrifying and little-known tragedies.

wolfWolf Hollow by Lauren Wolk

Annabelle has lived in Wolf Hollow all her life: a quiet place, still scarred by two world wars. But when cruel, manipulative Betty arrives in town, Annabelle’s calm world is shattered, along with everything she’s ever known about right and wrong. When Betty accuses gentle loner Toby – a traumatised ex-soldier – of a terrible act, Annabelle knows he’s innocent. Then Betty disappears . . . Now Annabelle must protect Toby from the spiraling accusations and hysteria, until she can prove to Wolf Hollow what really happened to Betty.

The language used in this novel exquisitely conveys the atmosphere of the 1940s American rural setting. The naivety of the voice vividly conveys the mores of the time and the young narrator. Every character is believable, well developed and fully rounded, combined with well observed small domestic details. This is a truthful exploration of a small-time attitudes and injustice without being overly sentimental, and exploring questions of morality within the confines of the story. In places, it has shades of ‘To Kill a Mockingbird’, making it a rich and satisfying read.

You can borrow these books from our libraries, so check out our catalogue to see if it’s in a library near you: http://bit.ly/1zSCJlf

The winners of the 2016 Medals and inaugural Amnesty CILIP Honours have been announced.

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One by Sarah Crossan

Grace and Tippi are conjoined twins. And their lives are about to change. No longer able to afford homeschooling, they must venture into the world – a world of stares, sneers and cruelty. Will they find more than that at school? Can they find real friends? And what about love? But what neither Grace nor Tippi realises is that a heart-wrenching decision lies ahead. A decision that could tear them apart. One that will change their lives even more than they ever imagined.

No words are wasted in this poignant and thought-provoking novel, yet it conveys so much. Written in free verse, each chapter is a poem and a work of art in its own right, collectively they create a highly emotive and engaging story. This creative style quickly draws the reader into the characters’ lives and creates a strong sense of urgency. The two main characters are impressively distinctive and developed, their contrasting temperaments highlighting their closeness and interdependence. This is a deeply moving, insightful, beautifully observed and unusual, but perfectly crafted, book that will stay with the reader long after its close.

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The Sleeper and the Spindle written by Neil Gaiman and Illustrated by Chris Riddell.

On the eve of her wedding, a young queen sets out to rescue a princess from an enchantment. She casts aside her fine wedding clothes, takes her chain mail and sword and follows her brave dwarf retainers into the tunnels under the mountain towards the sleeping kingdom. This queen will decide her own future – and the princess who needs rescuing is not quite what she seems. Twisting together the familiar and the new, this perfectly delicious, captivating and darkly funny tale shows its creators at the peak of their talents.

This book is an absolutely stunning artefact in its own right. The gothic style of Chris Riddell’s mainly black and white pen and ink illustrations, with gold highlights, creates a truly magical fairy tale appeal for Neil Gaiman’s story. The detail and complexity of the illustrations allows the eye to enjoy the sumptuous pleasures of the clever use of such a limited palette – for example the deep shine of the Queen’s dark hair. The pictures are spooky, threatening, mysterious and inviting all at the same time with the daring use of solid black areas in many of the pictures heightening the general air of mystery and foreboding. This book will be appreciated by readers of all ages.

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It’s 1959. The battle for civil rights is raging. And it’s Sarah’s first day of school as one of the first black students at previously all-white Jefferson High. No one wants Sarah there. Not the Governor. Not the teachers. And certainly not the students – especially Linda, daughter of the town’s most ardent segregationist. Sarah and Linda are supposed to despise each other. But the more time they spend together, the less their differences matter. And both girls start to feel something they’ve never felt before. Something they’re determined to ignore. Because it’s one thing to stand up to an unjust world – but another to be terrified of what’s in your own heart.

The story is told from the point of view of Sarah and of Linda, the white daughter of one of the town’s most vehement segregationists. Both voices are authentic, flawed teenagers searching for their sense of self, and yet able to grow throughout the book. The shocking historical use of language as spoken at the time is discomforting for the reader, but creates a sense of the real experience of the daily abuse depicted. With themes of race and sexuality this is a book which could have been almost impossible to read but the style makes it gripping and involving with an emotional response from the reader inevitable.

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Poor Mouse! A bear has settled in his favourite chair and that chair just isn’t big enough for two. Mouse tries all kinds of tactics to move the pesky Bear but nothing works and poor Mouse gives up. Once Mouse has eventually gone, Bear gets up and walks home. But what’s that? Is that a Mouse in Bear’s house?!

Ross Collins portrays perfectly the anger and frustration of the mouse at the deliberate provocative snub from the bear through beautiful, bold, confident yet simple drawings. Colour is used to great effect; background and font colours reflect the mood of the mouse with red used to depict pure anger. The book is littered with visual humour that can be enjoyed at many different levels, from the facial expressions of both mouse and bear to more adult references to Elvis and endangered species. Ross Collins uses the double page spread effectively; he is not afraid to leave space and through this ensures that the mouse and bear are always the focus of the illustration. With text and story that are in perfect synergy this is a complete package from cover to cover.

One of the national judge was our children’s librarian Elizabeth McDonald, who got to attend the awards ceremony on Monday June 20th at The British Library in London.

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You can watch the award ceremony here: http://www.carnegiegreenaway.org.uk/stream.php

To borrow these books, check out our catalogue to see if it’s in a library near you: http://bit.ly/1zSCJlf

Carnegie Longlisted Books to explore

 

We are posting book reviews about all of the long listed books, let us know your thoughts on each of these amazing titles.

Lies We Tell Ourselves by Robin Talley

Lies we tell ourselvesIn 1959 Virginia, the lives of two girls on opposite sides of the battle for civil rights will be changed forever. Sarah Dunbar is one of the first black students to attend the previously all-white Jefferson High School. Linda Hairston is the daughter of one of the town’s most vocal opponents of school integration. She has been taught all her life that the races should be
kept ‘separate but equal.’ Forced to work together on a school project, Sarah and Linda must confront harsh truths about race, power and how they really feel about one another.


Fire Colour One
by Jenny Valentine

fire colour oneIris’s father, Ernest, is at the end of his life and she hasn’t even met him. Her best friend, Thurston, is somewhere on the other side of the world. Everything she thought she knew is up in flames. Now her mother has declared war and means to get her hands on Ernest’s priceless art collection. But Ernest has other ideas. There are things he wants Iris to know after he’s gone. And the truth has more than one way of coming to light.


My Name’s Not Friday
by Jon Walter

friThis boy has bought me. This white boy who don’t even look as old as I am. He owns me body and soul, and my worth has been set at six hundred dollars. Samuel’s an educated boy. Been taught by a priest. He was never supposed to be a slave. He’s a good boy too, thoughtful and kind. The type of boy who’d take the blame for something he didn’t do, if it meant he could save his brother. So now they don’t call him Samuel anymore. And the sound of guns is getting ever closer…


Liccle Bit
by Alex Wheatle

Liccle BitVenetia King is the hottest girl at school. Too bad Lemar is the second shortest guy in his year. Everyone calls him Liccle Bit, and his two best friends, McKay and Jonah, never tire of telling him he has no chance with girls. Things aren’t much better at home. His mum is permanently hassled, his sister a frustrated single mum and his dad moved out years ago. Liccle Bit wishes he could do something – anything! – to make life better. When Venetia starts paying Liccle Bit attention, he secretly hopes he’s on a fast track to a first date. Unfortunately, as a new gang war breaks out, he finds himself on a fast track to something much more sinister.

You can borrow these books from our libraries, so check out our catalogue to see if it’s in a library near you: http://bit.ly/1zSCJlf

 

Carnegie Longlisted Books to explore

We are posting book reviews about all of the long listed books, let us know your thoughts on each of these amazing titles.

We Are All Made of Molecules by Susin Nielsen

moleculesMeet Stewart. He’s geeky, gifted, and sees things a bit differently to most people. His mum has died and he misses her all the more now he and Dad have moved in with Ashley and her mum. Meet Ashley. She’s popular, cool, and sees things very differently to her new family. Her dad has come out and moved out – but not far enough. And now she has to live with a freakazoid step-brother. Stewart can’t quite fit in at his new school, and Ashley can’t quite get used to her totally awkward home, which is now filled with some rather questionable decor. And things are about to get a whole lot more mixed up when these two very different people attract the attention of school hunk Jared.


The Rest of Us Just Live Here
by Patrick Ness

the rest of us just live hereThis bold and irreverent novel powerfully asks what if you weren’t the ‘chosen one’? The one who’s supposed to fight the zombies, or the soul-eating ghosts, or whatever this new thing is, with the blue lights and the death? What if you were like Mikey? Who just wants to graduate and go to prom and maybe finally work up the courage to ask Henna out before someone goes and blows up his high school. Again. Because sometimes there are problems bigger than this week’s end of the world and sometimes you just have to find the extraordinary in your ordinary life. Even if your best friend might just be the God of mountain lions …


Jessica’s Ghost
by Andrew Norriss

jessica's ghostWhen Francis meets a ghost on the school playing field, the ghost is almost as surprised as he is. Jessica has been dead for over a year, but no one has been able to see or hear her before. No one.

Apart from the fact that she’s dead, Jessica seems a perfectly ordinary girl, but the mystery remains – Why is Francis the only one who can see her? And why can’t she remember how she died?

 


Panther
by David Owen

pantherLife isn’t going terribly well for Derrick; he’s become severely overweight, his only friend has turned on him, he’s hopelessly in love with a girl way out of his league, and it’s all because of his sister. Her depression, and its grip on his family, is tearing his life apart. When rumours start to circulate that a panther is roaming wild in his south London suburb, Derrick resolves to turn capture it. Surely if he can find a way to tame this beast, he’ll be able to stop everything at home from spiraling towards disaster?

 

You can borrow these books from our libraries, so check out our catalogue to see if it’s in a library near you: http://bit.ly/1zSCJlf

Carnegie and Kate Greenaway Award Display

The long lists for both the CILIP Carnegie and Kate Greenaway Medals, the UK’s oldest and most prestigious children’s book awards, have been revealed and are available to borrow from Wokingham Library.  The long lists identify a range of outstanding books for children and young people of all ages and interests and from new and established authors and illustrators.

 

The books long listed for the 2016 CILIP Carnegie Medal are:

  • Book by John Agard
  • A Song For Ella Grey by David Almond
  • One by Sarah Crossan
  • The Earth Is Singing by Vanessa Curtis
  • The Door That Led To Where by Sally Gardner
  • The Lie Tree by Frances Hardinge
  • The Imaginary by A.F. Harrold
  • There Will Be Lies by Nick Lake
  • We Are All Made of Molecules by Susin Neilsen
  • The Rest of Us Just Live Here by Patrick Ness
  • Jessica’s Ghost by Andrew Norriss
  • Panther by David Owen
  • The Shepherd’s Crown by Terry Pratchett
  • Five Children on the Western Front by Kate Saunders
  • The Ghosts of Heaven by Marcus Sedgwick
  • Thirteen Chairs by Dave Shelton
  • Lies We Tell Ourselves by Robin Talley
  • Fire Colour One by Jenny Valentine
  • My Name’s Not Friday by Jon Walter
  • Liccle Bit by Alex Wheatle

The books longlisted for the 2016 CILIP Kate Greenaway Medal are:

  • Please Mr Panda illustrated and written by Steve Antony
  • Where’s the Elephant? illustrated and written by Barroux
  • Willy’s Stories illustrated and written by Anthony Browne
  • This Book Just Ate My Dog! illustrated and written by Richard Byrne
  • Wall illustrated and written by Tom Clohosy Cole
  • There’s a Bear on My Chair illustrated and written by Ross Collins
  • Grandad’s Island illustrated and written by Benji Davies
  • How the Sun Got to Coco’s House illustrated and written by Bob Graham
  • The Imaginary illustrated by Emily Gravett, written by A.F Harrold
  • Once Upon an Alphabet illustrated and written by Oliver Jeffers
  • The Day the Crayons Came Home illustrated by Oliver Jeffers, written by Drew Daywalt
  • Sam and Dave Dig a Hole illustrated by Jon Klassen, written by Mac Barnett
  • Something About a Bear illustrated and written by Jackie Morris
  • Captain Jack and the Pirates illustrated by Helen Oxenbury, written by Peter Bently
  • Goth Girl and the Fete Worse Than Death illustrated and written by Chris Riddell
  • The Sleeper and the Spindle illustrated by Chris Riddell, written by Neil Gaiman
  • The Bolds illustrated by David Roberts, written by Julian Clary
  • Animalium illustrated by Katie Scott, written by Jenny Broom
  • Footpath Flowers illustrated by Sydney Smith, written by Jon Arno Lawson
  • Lili illustrated and written by Wen Dee Tan

We will be posting book reviews about all of the long listed books over the next couple of weeks, let us know your thoughts.

You can borrow these books from our libraries, so check out our catalogue to see if it’s in a library near you: http://bit.ly/1zSCJlf

Carnegie Longlisted Books to explore

We are posting book reviews about all of the long listed books over the next couple of weeks, let us know your thoughts on each of these amazing titles.

 

bookBook by John Agard

Quirky and humorous, part poetry, part reflection, this is the story of the book told by none other than Book himself! This extraordinary character begins by reminding us of his origins in oral story and clay tablets, then ponders on papyrus, parchment and paper, and on being a scroll who finally gets a spine. We see him lovingly illuminated by monks in medieval monasteries, then witness the massive changes brought about by the invention of the printing press, and the coming of paperbacks and e-books in the 20th century.

a song for ella greyA Song For Ella Grey by David Almond

I’m the one who’s left behind. I’m the one to tell the tale. I knew them both…knew how they lived and how they died. Claire is Ella Grey‘s best friend. She’s there when the whirlwind arrives on the scene: catapulted into a North East landscape of gutted shipyards; of high arched bridges and ancient collapsed mines. She witnesses a love so dramatic it is as if her best friend has been captured and taken from her. But the loss of her friend to the arms of Orpheus is nothing compared to the loss she feels when Ella is taken from the world. This is her story – as she bears witness to a love so complete; so sure, that not even death can prove final.

oneOne by Sarah Crossan

Grace and Tippi are twins – conjoined twins. And their lives are about to change. No longer able to afford homeschooling, they must venture into the world – a world of stares, sneers and cruelty. Will they find more than that at school? Can they find real friends? And what about love?   Just as Tippi and Grace have begun to live like normal teenagers, Grace gets sick, so sick separation might be the only option left open to them. But separation could mean spending the rest of their lives in wheelchairs. Separation could mean death. And whatever happens, it means being torn apart.

the earth is singingThe Earth Is Singing by Vanessa Curtis

My name is Hanna. I am 15. I am Latvian. I live with my mother and grandmother. My father is missing, taken by the Russians. I have a boyfriend and I’m training to be a dancer. But none of that is important any more. Because the Nazis have arrived, and I am a Jew. And as far as they are concerned, that is all that matters. This is my story.

 

You can borrow these books from our libraries, so check out our catalogue to see if it’s in a library near you: http://bit.ly/1zSCJlf

Carnegie and Kate Greenaway Longlist 2016

PrintNominations have been published for two of the most prestigious prizes in writing and illustrating for children. The CILIP Carnegie Medal is awarded annually for an outstanding book for children and young people while the CILIP Kate Greenaway Medal is awarded for an outstanding book in terms of illustration for children and young people.

93 books have been nominated for the CILIP Carnegie Medal and 69 nominated for the Kate Greenaway medal. The official long and shortlists identify a range of outstanding books for children and young people of all ages and interests and from new and established authors and illustrators. Our Reader Development Officer for Children, Elizabeth McDonald is currently judging this year’s prize, along with 12 other judges from around the United Kingdom.

The books long listed for the 2016 CILIP Carnegie Medal are:
  • Book by John Agard
  • A Song For Ella Grey by David Almond
  • One by Sarah Crossan
  • The Earth Is Singing by Vanessa Curtis
  • The Door That Led To Where by Sally Gardner
  • The Lie Tree by Frances Hardinge
  • The Imaginary by A.F. Harrold
  • There Will Be Lies by Nick Lake
  • We Are All Made of Molecules by Susin Neilsen
  • The Rest of Us Just Live Here by Patrick Ness
  • Jessica’s Ghost by Andrew Norriss
  • Panther by David Owen
  • The Shepherd’s Crown by Terry Pratchett
  • Five Children on the Western Front by Kate Saunders
  • The Ghosts of Heaven by Marcus Sedgwick
  • Thirteen Chairs by Dave Shelton
  • Lies We Tell Ourselves by Robin Talley
  • Fire Colour One by Jenny Valentine
  • My Name’s Not Friday by Jon Walter
  • Liccle Bit by Alex Wheatle
The books longlisted for the 2016 CILIP Kate Greenaway Medal are:
  • Please Mr Panda illustrated and written by Steve Antony
  • Where’s the Elephant? illustrated and written by Barroux
  • Willy’s Stories illustrated and written by Anthony Browne
  • This Book Just Ate My Dog! illustrated and written by Richard Byrne
  • Wall illustrated and written by Tom Clohosy Cole
  • There’s a Bear on My Chair illustrated and written by Ross Collins
  • Grandad’s Island illustrated and written by Benji Davies
  • How the Sun Got to Coco’s House illustrated and written by Bob Graham
  • The Imaginary illustrated by Emily Gravett, written by A.F Harrold
  • Once Upon an Alphabet illustrated and written by Oliver Jeffers
  • The Day the Crayons Came Home illustrated by Oliver Jeffers, written by Drew Daywalt
  • Sam and Dave Dig a Hole illustrated by Jon Klassen, written by Mac Barnett
  • Something About a Bear illustrated and written by Jackie Morris
  • Captain Jack and the Pirates illustrated by Helen Oxenbury, written by Peter Bently
  • Goth Girl and the Fete Worse Than Death illustrated and written by Chris Riddell
  • The Sleeper and the Spindle illustrated by Chris Riddell, written by Neil Gaiman
  • The Bolds illustrated by David Roberts, written by Julian Clary
  • Animalium illustrated by Katie Scott, written by Jenny Broom
  • Footpath Flowers illustrated by Sydney Smith, written by Jon Arno Lawson
  • Lili illustrated and written by Wen Dee Tan

We will be posting book reviews about all of the long listed books over the next couple of weeks, let us know your thoughts.  You can borrow these books from our libraries, so check out our catalogue to see if it’s in a library near you: http://bit.ly/1zSCJlf