Enid Blyton Indoor Activities

These activities are inspired by Enid Blyton’s books and the prompts for these activities can be found in the book Ripping Things to Do: The Best Games and Ideas from Children’s Books by Jane Brocket. With the introductions done, let’s get on to some smashing activities you can do yourselves.

Cracking Codes
What better way to start your Enid Blyton week activity by learning a code, or making one up, and the asking someone to de-code a message you leave them? In Blyton’s adventure books, such as The Famous Five, The Secret Seven, and The Five Find-Outers and Dog.

Codes you can learn:-

Morse code – a series of dots and dashes that people use for letters of the alphabet. The most common Morse code signal you may have heard of is S.O.S which is depicted as “Dot dot dot – dash dash dash – dot dot dot”. Use the pictures below to try sending secret messages either by tapping out the dots and dashes (use short sharp taps for the dots and leave longer gaps between taps for the dashes), flashing a torch light or a mirror in sunlight (mind the other person’s eyes), or by writing down the dots and dashes.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Semaphore alphabet – just to clarify the semaphore I’m talking about here is the kind used on ships, navy vessels, and in airports, not the kind to do with computer science. This semaphore is usually done by moving your arms into the positions shown in the picture to create signals and letters. Usually these are done with flags so that you are able to see the signal from a bigger distance, not to mention the bright colours in these flags help catch attention. Try coping the alphabet from below, maybe you can use some cloths that a parent or guardian has around, and when you’ve mastered the alphabet, try sending a message for someone else to crack!

Semaphore flag signals, alphabet and numbers

Creating your own code:-
Ways to create your own codes can be as simple as assigning each letter of the alphabet a different letter of the alphabet. So for example A becomes Z and Z becomes A. To send a message with your own code you would spell out the message with your own alphabet and the other person would have to work out what it says.
Another way to make a code is to give each letter a number or symbol, so A would be the number 1, B-2 and so on. You’d make it more complicated I’m sure! For the symbols, think about what symbols are on a keyboard, or what your most used emojis are (if you are lucky enough to have access to a device with emojis) and give each letter a symbol or emoji.
You could also give each letter a word, like B could be Banana, C – chocolate or Wombat for W. You could use as many words as you wanted from wherever. Animals and foods are good codes to try, but you could always use things you have about your house, or Pokemon for example.
With all good code creators to start with, make a note of your code so that you can decode any messages or help the person you’re sending a message to in case they get stuck!
Invisible Ink: – Another idea for sending coded messages is using certain house hold products to create an invisible ink. You can use any liquid that dries clear, but when heated turns brown! Juices like orange, lemon and apple work well, and milk or diluted honey are some other alternatives. Why don’t you have a play around with some other (adult agreed) liquids to see what might also work?
To do the writing, you can use a pen with a nib (not your best fountain pen!) a feather, toothpick, cocktail stick, rubber stamps, a thin paint brush or use your finger. Use your codes to make an invisible message!

Card Games
A good chunk of the time spent indoors in Enid Blyton’s books are spent either doing homework, reading, or playing card games.
Now you can play any of the card games you have in the house, Top Trumps, Uno, Happy Families, but if you want to try and learn a new game, some of the ones that Enid Blyton wrote about for example, you can check out this website for 12 games to play with a standard deck of cards, or ask permission or a grown up, to look up these games below:
• Snap
• Beggar my neighbour
• Go Fish
• Cheat
• Old Maid
• Chase the Ace
• Patience
• Rummy

Indoor Den
A good way to pretend that you’re camping like many good Enid Blyton characters is to build a den in your house. We’ll be looking at what you’ll need to create a den and a few ideas on how to put it together.
What you might want to get together, or ask an adult if you cause use are:
• Pillows
• Blankets
• Cuddly toys
• Fairy lights
Find a space you can use, maybe a living room, or under the dining room table, or between two chairs. Drape your blanket over the table, chairs or the sofa in the living room. Then make your den as comfortable as possible and enjoy!
This den can be anything such as a tent, a cave, a castle, a ship, treasure island, whatever you want! You could even use your new codes as an entry word, or you can play some of the card games you’ve just learnt to do in your den, colour, draw maps, and discover some treasure. If you’re lucky enough to have a tablet, laptop or set up in front of a TV maybe you could enjoy the Malory Towers TV series that’s on CBBC iPlayer right now!

Bake-a-Long a Blyton

EB activity banner

If you know anything about Enid Blyton’s books you will know that a huge part of them is the food. In fact I would even go as far to say that one of the reasons you come back to the books time and time again, child or adult, is because of those sweet descriptions of the food. I know I wanted to go on pretty much every epic picnic, camping holiday and to every place selling homemade cakes that were mentioned in the books.

It was through Blyton’s books I tried new foods, and even started trying to make and bake things that were inspired by them. Ginger biscuits, fresh and gooey English macaroons, barley sugars, treacle tart, jammy buns, strawberry tarts, lemonade and hard boiled eggs. The pages of the books are crammed full of delicious recipes and you can get two recipes to make from us today, inspired by Jane Brocket’s Cherry Cake and Ginger Beer book, I’ve provided recipes for the smashing fresh and gooey macaroons, and the absolutely wizard ginger biscuits.
Note: the macaroons are not the fancy French variety, but the easy bake, easy make almond English variety. Perfect for those who are gluten free, but just scrummy all around!

You can download these recipes below. Don’t forget to share your pictures of them when you’ve made them! Happy baking!

Fresh and Gooey Macaroons

Joanna’s OBCBE Ginger Biscuits

Enid Blyton Inspired Indoor Activities

These activities are inspired by Enid Blyton’s books and the prompts for these activities can be found in the book Ripping Things to Do: The Best Games and Ideas from Children’s Books by Jane Brocket. With the introductions done, let’s get on to some smashing activities you can do yourselves.

Cracking Codes

What better way to start your Enid Blyton week activity by learning a code, or making one up, and the asking someone to de-code a message you leave them? In Blyton’s adventure books, such as The Famous Five, The Secret Seven, and The Five Find-Outers and Dog.

Codes you can learn:-

Morse code – a series of dots and dashes that people use for letters of the alphabet. The most common Morse code signal you may have heard of is S.O.S which is depicted as “Dot dot dot – dash dash dash – dot dot dot”. Use the pictures below to try sending secret messages either by tapping out the dots and dashes (use short sharp taps for the dots and leave longer gaps between taps for the dashes), flashing a torch light or a mirror in sunlight (mind the other person’s eyes),  or by writing down the dots and dashes.

Semaphore alphabet – just to clarify the semaphore I’m talking about here is the kind used on ships, navy vessels, and in airports, not the kind to do with computer science. This semaphore is usually done by moving your arms into the positions shown in the picture to create signals and letters. Usually these are done with flags so that you are able to see the signal from a bigger distance, not to mention the bright colours in these flags help catch attention.  Try coping the alphabet from below, maybe you can use some cloths that a parent or guardian has around, and when you’ve mastered the alphabet, try sending a message for someone else to crack!

Creating your own code:-

Ways to create your own codes can be as simple as assigning each letter of the alphabet a different letter of the alphabet. So for example A becomes Z and Z becomes A. To send a message with your own code you would spell out the message with your own alphabet and the other person would have to work out what it says.

Another way to make a code is to give each letter a number or symbol, so A would be the number 1, B-2 and so on. You’d make it more complicated I’m sure! For the symbols, think about what symbols are on a keyboard, or what your most used emojis are (if you are lucky enough to have access to a device with emojis) and give each letter a symbol or emoji. 

You could also give each letter a word, like B could be Banana, C – chocolate or Wombat for W. You could use as many words as you wanted from wherever. Animals and foods are good codes to try, but you could always use things you have about your house, or Pokemon for example.

With all good code creators to start with, make a note of your code so that you can decode any messages or help the person you’re sending a message to in case they get stuck!

Invisible Ink: – Another idea for sending coded messages is using certain house hold products to create an invisible ink. You can use any liquid that dries clear, but when heated turns brown! Juices like orange, lemon and apple work well, and milk or diluted honey are some other alternatives. Why don’t you have a play around with some other (adult agreed) liquids to see what might also work?

To do the writing, you can use a pen with a nib (not your best fountain pen!) a feather, toothpick, cocktail stick, rubber stamps, a thin paint brush or use your finger. Use your codes to make an invisible message!

Card Games

A good chunk of the time spent indoors in Enid Blyton’s books are spent either doing homework, reading, or playing card games.

Now you can play any of the card games you have in the house, Top Trumps, Uno, Happy Families, but if you want to try and learn a new game, some of the ones that Enid Blyton wrote about for example, you can check out this website for 12 games to play with a standard deck of cards, or ask permission or a grown up, to look up these games below:

  • Snap
  • Beggar my neighbour
  • Go Fish
  • Cheat
  • Old Maid
  • Chase the Ace
  • Patience
  • Rummy

Indoor Den

A good way to pretend that you’re camping like many good Enid Blyton characters is to build a den in your house. We’ll be looking at what you’ll need to create a den and a few ideas on how to put it together.

What you might want to get together, or ask an adult if you cause use are:

  • Pillows
  • Blankets
  • Cuddly toys
  • Fairy lights

Find a space you can use, maybe a living room, or under the dining room table, or between two chairs. Drape your blanket over the table, chairs or the sofa in the living room. Then make your den as comfortable as possible and enjoy!

This den can be anything such as a tent, a cave, a castle, a ship, treasure island, whatever you want! You could even use your new codes as an entry word, or you can play some of the card games you’ve just learnt to do in your den, colour, draw maps, and discover some treasure. If you’re lucky enough to have a tablet, laptop or set up in front of a TV maybe you could enjoy the Malory Towers TV series that’s on CBBC iPlayer right now!

Splendid Titles – What to read after Enid Blyton

Banner kindly taken from https://worldofblyton.com/
  • The Mystery of Wickworth Manor – Elen Caldecott
  • Wed Wabbit – Lissa Evans
  • The Adventures Series – Jemma Hatt
  • The Clifftoppers series – Fleur Hitchcock

  • The Binny Series – Hilary McKay
  • The Skylarks’ War – Hilary Mckay
  • The Adventure Island Series – Helen Moss
  • Ribblestrop – Andy Mulligan

  • The Worst Witch – Jill Murphy
  • A Laura Marlin  Mysteries –  Lauren St John
  • Emily Lime mysteries – Dave Shelton
  • Frozen in Time – Ali Sparkes

  • Murder Most Unladylike – Robin Stevens
  • The Mystery of Clockwork Sparrow – Katherine Woodfine
  • Any titles by Emma Carroll

If you like reading Enid Blyton why not try: https://www.booktrust.org.uk/news-and-features/features/2018/august/what-to-read-after-enid-blyton/

Enid Blyton Inspired Outdoor Activities

These activities are inspired by Enid Blyton’s books and the prompts for these activities can be found in the book Ripping Things to Do: The Best Games and Ideas from Children’s Books by Jane Brocket. With the introductions done, let’s get on to some smashing activities you can do yourselves.

Outdoor Den

A good way to pretend that you’re camping like many good Enid Blyton characters is to build a den in your garden. We’ll be looking at what you’ll need to create a den and a few ideas on how to put it together.

What you might want to get together, or ask an adult if you cause use are:

  • Pillows
  • Blankets
  • A torch or Fairy lights

You could also just use a tent if you are lucky enough to have one at home, but make sure you kit it out with torches, cushions, sleeping bags and a picnic!

If you’re making a den out of blankets, you could use the washing line to put your blanket over, even better if there’s a bit of a breeze because you can secure it on the line!

If you have an outside chair and table, you can also use that to make your den! Have a play around with what you have! A piece of string secured between two sturdy points is another good option! Make sure you ask an adult to help you with that.

Then use your cushions to make your den nice and comfortable, and think up a password to let people in, Secret Seven style!

Jam Jars

This isn’t really something from Enid Blyton, but I think there are some really super things you can do with a jam jar!

  • Use a large jam jar to put some home grown, or wild flowers from your walks in to go at the centre of your dining table or on a mantelpiece.
  • Take your jam jar fishing! Take your net to your local stream, or body of water and as long as it is safe to do so fill your jar with water from the stream or lake, or sea and when you catch things in your net you can put them in the jam jar to have a closer look at the animals, fish, snails, and plant life around you.
  • Take your jam jar on your walk or around your garden, and fill it with flowers, pebbles and interesting things to take a closer look at when you get home or a bit later on! If you’re really super brave, maybe you can carefully and gently catch a bug to have a closer look at!
  • As we’re getting into summer, the bushes around are going to be filling up with fruit! You could take your jam jar with you to go black berry picking, or collecting sloes, or cherries or strawberries all in the wild around you! Just make sure these fruits are not in anyone’s garden or on private land!

Having a picnic

In my mind there is nothing more basically Enid Blyton than a picnic outside in the sun! Maybe you can have the macaroons or Ginger biscuits you baked with Tuesday’s Bake-a-Along post for part of your picnic.

You’ll need some sandwiches as well, a hard-boiled egg perhaps, maybe some crisps if you don’t want to be too Enid Blyton! Fresh tomatoes are usually a very good addition to any picnic, as is ginger beer (but don’t worry if you don’t like ginger beer, you might be able to have something else instead!)

When it comes to pudding on picnics, cake is a good shout, but as I suggested you might want to have the macaroons or ginger biscuits you made earlier this week!

Don’t forget something to sit on! A picnic rug might be the best option, but if you want to sit on the grass, that’s fine – but don’t sit on anything spiky cause it might hurt!

Making a Map

For your next trip outside you could draw a map, either of where you’re going to go, or to somewhere you think there might be treasure. Making maps is really cool, especially if you can do it in your house or your garden and you can hide some treasure for someone else to find, or maybe an adult can draw a map and hide some treasure for you to find!

If you want to have a fun treasure hunt as a family, or if a parent or guardian is happy to do so, you can download apps for Geocaching and you can use the map on the app to find Tupperware boxes with treasure in!

Exploring

As long as you maintain your social distancing, maybe on your next trip outside, or even just in your garden at home, you can go exploring like The Famous Five and have a look around the parks and places around you for hidden treasure, secret passages and maybe an adventure!

Smashing! Enid Blyton Activities

Enid Blyton Inspired Activities

Banner kindly taken from https://worldofblyton.com/

Join us this week in celebrating all things Blyton! We have put together this smashing list of activities to try.  Some of these activities will be going live on social media during the week. If you’ve taken part in any of our activities this week we would love to hear about it – share your photos on our social media or email them to libraries@wokingham.gov.uk

EB activity banner

Why not try one of the following activities:

  • Enid Blyton Origami Picnic – there is ginger beer, ice-cream, cake and of course Timmy the dog who loves a good picnic.
  • Photo challenge – It’s time to show off your Enid Blyton books.  Have you got any older copies? Which cover is your favourite? Can you get artistic with your photos?
  • Redesign a book cover – Publishers love redesigning book covers to make them stand out in the bookshop or library.  We want to see your redesign of your favourite Enid Blyton book cover!
  • Bake-A-Long-A-Blyton – Fresh and Gooey Macaroons and Joanna’s OBCBE Ginger Biscuits
  • Enid Blyton Outdoor Activities
  • Enid Blyton Indoor Activities
  • Enid Blyton Story Starter Writing Challenge
  • Draw a Famous Five Treasure map of Kirrin Island.  Gold ingots have been hidden on Kirrin Island, draw the map to help Julian, Dick, George, Anne and Timmy find the gold!
  • Enid Blyton Lego Weekly Challenge – Have a go at building a wishing chair, far away tree, caravan, castle, or island for the characters to explore or design your Timmy the dog
  • Activity Sheets Galore available to download:
  • If you love Enid Blyton books and want to know who writes like Enid, we’ve compiled a list of splendid titles here.