CILIP Kate Greenaway Medal 2018 shortlist available to borrow from Wokingham Borough Libraries

CILIP Kate Greenaway Medal 2018 shortlist available to borrow from Wokingham Borough Libraries

The CILIP Kate Greenaway Medal was established in 1955, for distinguished illustration in a book for children. It is named after the popular and highly influential nineteenth century artist known for her fine children’s illustrations and designs. Awarded annually, the Medal is the only prize in the UK to solely reward outstanding illustration in a children’s book.

Winner will be announced on Monday June 18, 2018 at The British Library, London.

CILIP Kate Greenaway Medal 2018 shortlist

King of the Sky by Nicola Davies and Laura Carlin

king of the skyStarting a new life in a new country, a young boy feels lost and alone – until he meets an old man who keeps racing pigeons. Together they pin their hopes on a race across Europe and the special bird they believe can win it: King of the Sky.

A powerful eloquent story is evocatively brought to life by the soft smoky images of the mining community and the use of childlike capitalisation of the text cleverly reflects the narrative voice. The landscape of pit head chimneys, the surrounding hills and the pigeons in flight are hauntingly beautiful and contrast with the images of Rome and the memories of war. The Lowry-esque figures are poignant, characterful and full of emotion, fully capturing the sensitive power of this migration story.

Night Shift by Debi Gliori

night shiftA unique visual exploration of depression and anxiety and how these conditions can isolate sufferers of all ages. Night Shift offers insight, hope and a release from stigma.

This small book is a visual jewel. Its silvery, feathered endpapers frame a beautifully- illustrated narrative which offers respite from the inexorable cycle of depressive illness. Dragons are used throughout to represent depression: they suppress language, lay indiscriminate waste and cannot be outrun. Gliori’s command of technical execution is balanced on each page by subtlety, warmth and hope. Largely monochrome drawings flare into a dragon’s breath of fierce colour, but the abiding image is the feather of hope, ‘neither black, nor all white’.

A First Book of Animals by Nicola Davies and Petr Horáček

a first book of animalsA spellbinding treasury of poems about the animal world, illustrated in breath-taking detail. With polar bears playing on the ice, tigers hunting in the jungle, fireflies twinkling in the evening sky and nightingales singing in the heart of the woods – there are animals everywhere. A First Book of Animals takes you all over the planet to visit all kinds of different creatures. This book is a glorious celebration of life in the wild in all its variety and splendour.

These extraordinarily wide-reaching illustrations capture the wonder of the flora and fauna of Earth the world over. This book embraces and encapsulates the awe-inspiring base of the natural world with a range of artistic techniques, use of mixed media an accomplished use of scale. Double page spreads allow the poetic text to dance across the page whilst jewel-like colours and textured collages express the remarkable diversity of the natural world on a grand scale. Clever layouts and designs, with the occasional nod to works of natural history from yesteryear, make this a book which works on several levels. This is a visually arresting book that provides new experiences and exciting learning opportunities.

The Song from Somewhere Else by A F Harrold and Levi Pinfold

song from somewhere else (002)An atmospheric, quirky novel about two loners who become unlikely friends during one very strange summer holiday. Frank doesn’t know how to feel when Nick Underbridge rescues her from bullies one afternoon. No one likes Nick. But there’s more to Nick, and to his house, than meets the eye, and soon Frank realises she isn’t the only one keeping secrets. Or the only one who needs help …A poignant, darkly comic and deeply moving story from acclaimed poet A.F. Harrold about the power of the extraordinary, and finding friendship where you least expect it.

Pinfold’s swirling, smoky illustrations and limited use of palette add an unsettling layer of mystery and intrigue to this surreal adventure story about two young misfits. The sepia-tinted dust jacket with silver foil detail, and green nettle end papers, lead the reader into a dusty, small town where Frank and Nick strike up an unusual friendship. From our first sight of hulking Nick, to the small, detailed drawings which head each chapter Pinfold creates a very strong synergy, text and illustrations superbly marry together to create a sinister feel: a visual feast which offers a tantalising glimpse into another world…the magical world of trolls and ancient melodies which lives beyond Nick’s cellar.

Town is by the Sea by Joanne Schwartz and Sydney Smith

town is by the seaThis beautifully understated and haunting story brings a piece of mining history to life. A young boy spends an idyllic summer day in his small hometown – he heads to the playground with his friends, has lunch and goes to the shops for his mother. In the afternoon he visits his grandfather’s grave and remembers; but his thoughts continually return to his father, hard at work digging for coal under the sea…

“It goes like this…” Smith’s stunning illustrations bring to life a bygone era and what it would have been like in a Cape Breton mining town in the 1950’s. Broad, black lines, washes of colour and subtle use of shadow create a sense of movement. The oppressive darkness of the mines is contrasted with the vastness of the light-dappled sea and the calm of the bay where the boy tends his grandfather’s grave. Extensive use of double-paged spreads enhances this, while the use of smaller panels in the domestic scenes creates a sense of warmth, intimacy and anticipation of the father’s safe return. The closeness of family life and the beauty and power of the Nova Scotia landscape are vividly rendered on each page, enhancing Schwartz’s narrative. Contrasting darkness and confined space with freedom and light above ground, these pictures linger in the mind.

Thornhill by Pam Smy

 thornhillOrphaned Mary lives at Thornhill, Institute for Children where she is cruelly bullied by the other girls. Ella is irresistibly drawn to the big old house that she can see from her bedroom window. Surrounded by overgrown gardens, barbed wire fences and ‘keep out’ signs, it looks derelict. But when Ella spots Mary in the grounds a powerful friendship develops between the two lonely girls. This chilling story of the need to belong and a desire for revenge is cleverly told through the combination of Mary’s diary entries and full page monochrome illustrations.

Adept use of illustration drives the narrative in this remarkable piece of pictorial storytelling. The illustrations have a cinematic quality that integrates perfectly with the text, creating a powerful, atmospheric novel. The strong black and white sequential illustrations skilfully emphasise the darkness of the story, creating a sense of menace, loneliness and despair. Bold, harsh lines set the scene and the pictures are able to tell the story without the use of text in many places. Dark and heavy production values provide an innovative and fully immersive reading experience that oozes suspense from the very start.

Under the Same Sky by Britta Teckentrup

under the same skyAnimals of land, sea and sky, from around the globe, come together in this illustrated treat which celebrates the closeness of the world’s communities through their shared hopes and dreams.

The illustrator creates a simple, flowing narrative through her effective use of die cuts, clever composition and carefully considered colour palette, which is framed by the same mountain-top landscape on the textured board cover and elegant evergreen endpapers. We are taken on a voyage of discovery around the world; to rooftops, savannahs, meadows, oceans, forests and rivers. There is a natural rhythm and effective transition between each spread, and the animals and their young are rendered in Teckentrup’s distinctive style and given depth and perspective with a very clever use of texture and layering.

You can borrow these books from our libraries, so check out our catalogue to see if it’s in a library near you: http://bit.ly/1zSCJlf

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Carnegie & Kate Greenaway Medals

2018_CILIP_Carnegie_longlist[1]Carnegie and Kate Greenaway Medals

Shadowing the CILIP Carnegie & Kate Greenaway Medals is a fantastic opportunity to showcase and publicise how you inspire and challenge young readers. The longlist titles have been announced, http://www.carnegiegreenaway.org.uk/press.php?release=pres_2018_longlists_announced.html  these will be judged against the criteria and the shortlist will be announced on Thursday March 15, 2018 and the winner will be announced on Monday June 18, 2018.  The nominated books are titles published between September 2016 and August 2017 and highlight some of the best children’s books to read and share. Details can be found here: http://www.carnegiegreenaway.org.uk/shadowing.php

2018_CILIP_Kate_Greenaway_longlist[1]

If you are interested in shadowing the Carnegie and Kate Greenaway awards, have a look at the Shadowing website – http://www.carnegiegreenaway.org.uk/shadowing.php

For more information please contact Elizabeth McDonald, Reader Development Officer – Young People and Families on 0118 974 3709 or Elizabeth.mcdonald@wokingham.gov.uk

School visits to the Library

If you would like to bring your class to the library. Please contact the relevant library and we will try and accommodate any request.  To discuss anything relating to the Children’s Library Service that is not included above please contact Elizabeth McDonald on (0118) 9743709 or e-mail elizabeth.mcdonald@wokingham.gov.uk

CILIP Carnegie & Kate Greenaway Medals 2018 longlist announced

Print

The longlist has been published for two of the country’s oldest children’s book awards for writing and illustration for children. The CILIP (Chartered Institute for Information and Library Professionals) Carnegie medal is awarded annually for an outstanding book written in English for children, and the Kate Greenaway medal is awarded for distinguished illustration in a book for children and younger people.

The two 20-book longlists have been whittled down from 237 nominations see here for list. Alongside previous nominees and winners such as David Almond, Patrick Ness, Marcus Sedgwick and Philip Reeve are some new names – debut author Angie Thomas is nominated for her young adult novel about the Black Lives Matter movement, The Hate u Give, as are Irfan Master for his second young adult novel Out of Heart, and Kiran Millwood Hargrave for her second children’s novel The Island at the End of Everything.

This year’s Costa children’s book award winner Katherine Rundell is nominated for her novel The Explorer. There is one poetry book on the list: Joseph Coelho’s Overheard in a Tower Block, a poetic narrative about a city childhood.

For the second year in a row, one book is in the running for both awards: The Song from somewhere else, written by AF Harrold and illustrated by Levi Pinfold.

The shortlists will be announced on Thursday 15 March, with the overall winners revealed on Monday 18 June at a special daytime event at The British Library, hosted by June Sarpong.

The titles are available to borrow from Wokingham Borough Libraries or you can reserve via the online catalogue at http://www.wokingham.gov.uk/libraries/library-services/search-reserve-and-renew/items/

 

Spotlight on picture books

Picture books are stocked by all of our Wokingham Borough Libraries, and are extremely popular. We have received a lot of new picture books this week, which are all nominated for the CILIP Kate Greenaway Medal. This is awarded by children’s librarians for an outstanding book in terms of illustrations for children and young people.

This is a selection of the titles that we have bought. The nominations were published earlier this month, and the longlist is announced on February 18th 2018.

Michael Rosen, the English children’s novelist and poet, and Children’s Laureate from 2007 to 2009, recently tweeted – “Parents who share hundreds of picture books with their under-5s enable their children to make cognitive leaps through trying to interpret the logic and meanings suggested by the unstated differences between the pictures and the text”.

Picture books are also great fun! Print

 

CILIP Carnegie & Kate Greenaway Medals 2018 Reviews Cogheart by Peter Bunzl and Grumpy Frog by Ed Vere

CILIP Carnegie & Kate Greenaway Medals 2018

Nominations have been published for two of the country’s oldest children’s book awards for writing and illustration for children. The CILIP Carnegie Medal is awarded annually by CILIP for an outstanding book written in English for children and young people; while the CILIP Kate Greenaway Medal is awarded for distinguished illustration in a book for children and young people.

121 books have been nominated for the CILIP Carnegie Medal and 116 for the Kate Greenaway medal. In total 237 books have been nominated for 2018.

Over the next few months, Wokingham Borough Library staff will be reviewing and highlighting some of the nominated list.

Full nomination lists can be found here:

CILIP Carnegie Medal Nominated Titles 2018

CILIP Kate Greenaway Medal Nominated Titles 2018

Our first selections of nominations for the Carnegie Medal are:

Cogheart by Peter Bunzlcogheart

When 13-year-old Lily’s inventor father vanishes after a Zeppelin crash, Lily’s determined to hunt down the truth behind his disappearance, helped by Robert, the local clockmaker’s son, and her wily mechanical fox Malkin. But shadowy figures are closing in and treachery lurks among the smoky spires of London – along with a life-changing secret.

An action packed steampunk fantasy adventure that had us all gripped with its brilliantly woven characters and world-building and cast of mechanical wonders. An amazing read!

Our first selections of nominations for the Kate Greenaway Medal are:

Grumpy Frog by Ed Veregrumpy frog

Grumpy Frog is not grumpy. He loves green, and he loves to hop, and he loves winning. But what happens when Grumpy Frog doesn’t win, or encounters – horror of horrors – a Pink Rabbit? Join Grumpy Frog as he learns about compromise and tolerance, friendship and the power of saying sorry.

A hilarious book with a twist in the tail about getting – and getting rid of – the grumps, Grumpy Frog subtly teaches the importance of being kind to all.

These books are available to borrow from Wokingham Borough Libraries, visit our catalogue.

CILIP Carnegie & Kate Greenaway Medals 2018 Reviews A Quiet Kind of Thunder by Sara Barnard and Rapunzel by Bethan Woollvin

CILIP Carnegie & Kate Greenaway Medals 2018

Nominations have been published for two of the country’s oldest children’s book awards for writing and illustration for children. The CILIP Carnegie Medal is awarded annually by CILIP for an outstanding book written in English for children and young people; while the CILIP Kate Greenaway Medal is awarded for distinguished illustration in a book for children and young people.

121 books have been nominated for the CILIP Carnegie Medal and 116 for the Kate Greenaway medal. In total 237 books have been nominated for 2018.

Over the next few months, Wokingham Borough Library staff will be reviewing and highlighting some of the nominated list.

Full nomination lists can be found here:

CILIP Carnegie Medal Nominated Titles 2018

CILIP Kate Greenaway Medal Nominated Titles 2018

Our first selections of nominations for the Carnegie Medal are:

a quiet kind of thunderA Quiet Kind of Thunder by Sara Barnard

Steffi doesn’t talk, but she has so much to say. Rhys can’t hear, but he can listen. Their love isn’t a lightning strike, it’s the rumbling roll of thunder. Steffi has been a selective mute for most of her life – she’s been silent for so long that she feels completely invisible. But Rhys, the new boy at school, sees her. He’s deaf, and her knowledge of basic sign language means that she’s assigned to look after him. To Rhys it doesn’t matter that Steffi doesn’t talk and, as they find ways to communicate, Steffi finds that she does have a voice, and that she’s falling in love with the one person who makes her feel brave enough to use it.

Very easy to read, cute book about two characters, one who is deaf and one who deals with severe anxiety and selective mutism.  The book was cute and fun, maybe a bit predictable but an enjoyable read.

Our first selections of nominations for the Kate Greenaway Medal are:

Rapunzel by Bethan Woollvinrapunsel

Golden-haired princess Rapunzel is kept trapped in her lofty tower by a wicked witch, who lops off locks of her beautiful hair and sells them for her own profit. Can Rapunzel ever figure out a way to escape?

This is a visually captivating and refreshing retelling of a much-loved fairy tale. With her bright yellow hair, Rapunzel stands out against the black, white and grey background. With punchy short text and minimal illustrations, Woollvin knows just how to tell a story.

These books are available to borrow from Wokingham Borough Libraries, visit our catalogue.

 

CILIP Kate Greenaway Medal 2017 winner announced next week, have you read the shortlist?

CILIP Kate Greenaway Medal 2017 shortlist available to borrow from Wokingham Borough Libraries

The Kate Greenaway Medal was established in 1955 for distinguished illustration in a book for children. Named after the popular nineteenth century artist, known for her beautiful children’s illustrations and designs, the CILIP Kate Greenaway Medal is awarded annually for an outstanding book in terms of illustration for children and young people.

CILIP Kate Greenaway Medal 2017 shortlist

wildWild Animals of the North illustrated and written by Dieter Braun

A gorgeously illustrated study of the Northern Hemisphere’s wild animals, this biologically accurate encyclopaedia of beasts will enthral all. Through Dieter Braun’s beautiful and colourful illustrations, readers will be dazzled by the polar bears and orcas of the Arctic, Europe’s red foxes and swans, the pumas of North America, Asian pandas and many more!

These beautiful, expressive illustrations of animals capture their motion and personality in a way that is truly remarkable for such stylized images. The 3D effect of the stunning geometric line and use of colour makes them truly live and breathe on the page. The colour palette is subtle but beautifully suited to both habitats and the animals we meet there. The variety of layout makes every page turn a surprise and continually engages the reader’s interest. The interplay of text and images make this a really enjoyable and memorable learning experience.

tidyTIDY illustrated and written by Emily Gravett

Brand new from the critically acclaimed Emily Gravett, comes TIDY, a hilarious, vibrantly illustrated, rhyming tale about a badger called Pete, who is slightly over-zealous in his desire for complete cleanliness. Pete likes things neat, but unfortunately his forest home is not the tidiest of dwellings. As the weather, the Seasons, not to mention the other animals, hamper Pete’s dreams of a uncluttered existence, the crafty badger hatches a plan that is bound to keep everything permanently spick and span. But when Pete goes too far and concretes over his woodland home, he begins to realise that maybe his actions have caused more harm than good. And maybe a bit of mess now and again is actually rather a positive thing?

This charming and witty story perfectly delivers its message of environmental preservation with subtlety and humour. The depth of quality in its production is outstanding; the multi-layered hole on the front cover, the double sided dust jacket and the wonderful flaps draw in and delight the reader. Lush foliage and vibrant forest colours shine through, as the palette subtly changes to reflect the seasons. Full of humour and skilful comic visual details, such as the wonderful badger-like decoration on the vacuum cleaner, this is a book to delight readers of all ages.

wolvesThe Wolves of Currumpaw illustrated and written by William Grill

1892, New Mexico. A wolfpack roams the Currumpaw Valley, preying on the cattle and evading capture by the exasperated local ranchmen. Due to his knowledge of wolf behaviour, a British naturalist by the name of Ernest Thompson Seton is employed to hunt down their notorious pack leader, King Lobo… A moving re-telling of the first short story from Ernest Thompson Seton’s 1898 classic collection, Wild Animals I Have Known, this is the second book from CILIP Kate Greenaway Medal award winner William Grill.

The large format of this book allows the reader a great visual experience, echoing the vast plains of New Mexico. The beautifully rendered dust jacket and end papers, inspired by Navajo and Hopi designs, usher the reader into this atmospheric tale. The colour palette is chosen with utmost care and the technique of sweeping pencil strokes evoke the setting and easily allow the scale of the desert to show the insignificance of man and wolf in the whole area. This book works on many levels, from the unobtrusive typography telling the story, the tactile nature of the endpaper illustrations to the synergy between illustration style and the setting of the tale. Text and images and are all carefully placed on the page, underlining the scale of the desert; whilst the movement of the wolves is so simply expressed. Grill’s style is unique, distinctive and highly creative so much so that this books works on many levels, it is a deceptively simple medium showing a depth of richness and skill that is a testament to his skill.

harryHarry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone illustrated by Jim Kay, written by J.K. Rowling

When a letter arrives for unhappy but ordinary Harry Potter, a decade-old secret is revealed to him that apparently he’s the last to know. His parents were wizards, killed by a Dark Lord’s curse when Harry was just a baby, and which he somehow survived. Leaving his unsympathetic aunt and uncle for Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry, Harry stumbles upon a sinister mystery when he finds a three-headed dog guarding a room on the third floor. Then he hears of a missing stone with astonishing powers, which could be valuable, dangerous – or both. An incredible adventure is about to begin!

An outstanding illustrated version of a modern children’s classic, ready to bring a new generation of readers into the magical world of Harry Potter. These illustrations go back to the text and lure the reader away from the familiar film images. The artist has added so much more depth and detail to bring this world to life. For example there is a whole street worth of invented detail in Diagon Alley and we have intricate scientific drawings of the various species of troll that inhabit this world. There is an astonishing range of techniques and artistry shown throughout the book in a variety of full page portraits, small vignettes, chapter headings and the glorious end papers. This visualisation enhances the text and offers the reader a whole new, deeper and authentic experience.

cuddleA Great Big Cuddle illustrated by Chris Riddell and written by Michael Rosen

Two of the biggest names in children’s publishing, Michael Rosen and Chris Riddell, come together in a new poetry collection. The poems in A Great Big Cuddle fizz off the page with sound and rhythm, energy and laughter, as Rosen captures in the most remarkable way what it means to be very, very young. A child’s world with all its details and feelings – toys and games, animals and made-up creatures, likes and dislikes – is vividly conjured up in the most memorable, playful language, and Chris Riddell has produced some his most extraordinary pictures ever to bring this world to life. It’s a book that will be enjoyed by the oldest grown-up and the youngest child – and a future classic.

This is an unusual size for a picture book, but the layout of each poem works to give the reader a different experience every time a page is turned. The poems requiring movement have that in abundance in both typography and in the illustration. The simple primary colour palette makes the illustrations bold and engaging. There is a creative use of the vignettes that really adds to the textual experience. The illustrations underline the nonsense of the poetry making this a very satisfying and distinctive experience. Two people at the height of their powers combining to make a great book for very young people.

journeyThe Journey illustrated and written by Francesca Sanna

What is it like to have to leave everything behind and travel many miles to somewhere unfamiliar and strange? A mother and her two children set out on such a journey; one filled with fear of the unknown, but also great hope. Based on her interactions with people forced to seek a new home, and told from the perspective of a young child, The Journey is full of significance for our time.

These timely and distinctive illustrations offer a deep and emotional introduction to the losses and experiences that immigrant families face. A strong sense of movement is achieved throughout, as the family journey onwards in a quest for safety. The menace of war and evil are particularly well depicted through the imposing black sea representing the approaching war, and dense black shadows that bring a real and deep darkness with them. A carefully chosen palette of colours, tones and techniques are used to great effect in the depiction of both physical and emotional landscapes. Impressive use of the endpapers is made, as they respectively introduce and then continue the story. An unusual typeface is used for the sparse, yet moving text, resembling handwriting this poignantly emphasises the personal nature of the story. This book will have a powerful impact on readers of all ages.

marvelsThe Marvels illustrated and written by Brian Selznick

In The Marvels, Selznick weaves together two seemingly unrelated stories- one in words, the other in pictures -with spellbinding synergy. The illustrated story begins in 1766 with Billy Marvel, the lone survivor of a shipwreck, and charts the adventures of his family of actors over five generations. The prose story opens in 1990 and follows Joseph, who has run away from school to an estranged uncle’s puzzling house in London, where he, along with the reader, must piece together many mysteries. Filled with mystery, vibrant characters, surprise twists, and heart-rending beauty, and featuring Selznick’s most arresting art to date, The Marvels is a moving tribute to the power of story.

This visually stunning book invites exploration from the first page. The whole production is a work of art that is outstanding on every level. Detailed cross-hatched illustrations carry the reader’s focus to the heart of characters, action and drama through a near-cinematic zooming in and panning out. There is a strong use of space and a real awareness of how different forms. come together to produce a story, creating an innovative and fully immersive experience.

tribeThere is a Tribe of Kids illustrated and written by Lane Smith

Lane Smith takes us on a colourful adventure through the natural world, following a child as he weaves through the jungle, dives under the ocean and soars into the sky. Along the way he makes friends and causes mischief with a dazzling array of creatures both large and small – but can he find a tribe of his own? Full of warmth and humour, There Is a Tribe of Kids is a playful exploration of wild childhood – of curiosity, discovery and what it means to belong.

There’s a wonderful sense of movement, animation and life in the illustrations to this book. A palette comprised of muted earth tones emphasises and extends the natural tone and themes of the book. Use of sequencing is controlled and there is an impressive synergy and balance between text and illustration. There is a warmth and wit in the play and imagination shown in the final spreads showing how the children are influenced and inspired by the world around them suggesting ideas around the way nurture and environmental factors can be formative in growth.

You can borrow these books from our libraries, so check out our catalogue to see if it’s in a library near you: http://bit.ly/1zSCJlf

CILIP Kate Greenaway Medal 2017 shortlist available to borrow from Wokingham Borough Libraries

The Kate Greenaway Medal was established in 1955 for distinguished illustration in a book for children. Named after the popular nineteenth century artist, known for her beautiful children’s illustrations and designs, the CILIP Kate Greenaway Medal is awarded annually for an outstanding book in terms of illustration for children and young people.

CILIP Kate Greenaway Medal 2017 shortlist

wildWild Animals of the North illustrated and written by Dieter Braun

A gorgeously illustrated study of the Northern Hemisphere’s wild animals, this biologically accurate encyclopaedia of beasts will enthral all. Through Dieter Braun’s beautiful and colourful illustrations, readers will be dazzled by the polar bears and orcas of the Arctic, Europe’s red foxes and swans, the pumas of North America, Asian pandas and many more!

These beautiful, expressive illustrations of animals capture their motion and personality in a way that is truly remarkable for such stylized images. The 3D effect of the stunning geometric line and use of colour makes them truly live and breathe on the page. The colour palette is subtle but beautifully suited to both habitats and the animals we meet there. The variety of layout makes every page turn a surprise and continually engages the reader’s interest. The interplay of text and images make this a really enjoyable and memorable learning experience.

tidyTIDY illustrated and written by Emily Gravett

Brand new from the critically acclaimed Emily Gravett, comes TIDY, a hilarious, vibrantly illustrated, rhyming tale about a badger called Pete, who is slightly over-zealous in his desire for complete cleanliness. Pete likes things neat, but unfortunately his forest home is not the tidiest of dwellings. As the weather, the Seasons, not to mention the other animals, hamper Pete’s dreams of a uncluttered existence, the crafty badger hatches a plan that is bound to keep everything permanently spick and span. But when Pete goes too far and concretes over his woodland home, he begins to realise that maybe his actions have caused more harm than good. And maybe a bit of mess now and again is actually rather a positive thing?

This charming and witty story perfectly delivers its message of environmental preservation with subtlety and humour. The depth of quality in its production is outstanding; the multi-layered hole on the front cover, the double sided dust jacket and the wonderful flaps draw in and delight the reader. Lush foliage and vibrant forest colours shine through, as the palette subtly changes to reflect the seasons. Full of humour and skilful comic visual details, such as the wonderful badger-like decoration on the vacuum cleaner, this is a book to delight readers of all ages.

wolvesThe Wolves of Currumpaw illustrated and written by William Grill

1892, New Mexico. A wolfpack roams the Currumpaw Valley, preying on the cattle and evading capture by the exasperated local ranchmen. Due to his knowledge of wolf behaviour, a British naturalist by the name of Ernest Thompson Seton is employed to hunt down their notorious pack leader, King Lobo… A moving re-telling of the first short story from Ernest Thompson Seton’s 1898 classic collection, Wild Animals I Have Known, this is the second book from CILIP Kate Greenaway Medal award winner William Grill.

The large format of this book allows the reader a great visual experience, echoing the vast plains of New Mexico. The beautifully rendered dust jacket and end papers, inspired by Navajo and Hopi designs, usher the reader into this atmospheric tale. The colour palette is chosen with utmost care and the technique of sweeping pencil strokes evoke the setting and easily allow the scale of the desert to show the insignificance of man and wolf in the whole area. This book works on many levels, from the unobtrusive typography telling the story, the tactile nature of the endpaper illustrations to the synergy between illustration style and the setting of the tale. Text and images and are all carefully placed on the page, underlining the scale of the desert; whilst the movement of the wolves is so simply expressed. Grill’s style is unique, distinctive and highly creative so much so that this books works on many levels, it is a deceptively simple medium showing a depth of richness and skill that is a testament to his skill.

harryHarry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone illustrated by Jim Kay, written by J.K. Rowling

When a letter arrives for unhappy but ordinary Harry Potter, a decade-old secret is revealed to him that apparently he’s the last to know. His parents were wizards, killed by a Dark Lord’s curse when Harry was just a baby, and which he somehow survived. Leaving his unsympathetic aunt and uncle for Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry, Harry stumbles upon a sinister mystery when he finds a three-headed dog guarding a room on the third floor. Then he hears of a missing stone with astonishing powers, which could be valuable, dangerous – or both. An incredible adventure is about to begin!

An outstanding illustrated version of a modern children’s classic, ready to bring a new generation of readers into the magical world of Harry Potter. These illustrations go back to the text and lure the reader away from the familiar film images. The artist has added so much more depth and detail to bring this world to life. For example there is a whole street worth of invented detail in Diagon Alley and we have intricate scientific drawings of the various species of troll that inhabit this world. There is an astonishing range of techniques and artistry shown throughout the book in a variety of full page portraits, small vignettes, chapter headings and the glorious end papers. This visualisation enhances the text and offers the reader a whole new, deeper and authentic experience.

cuddleA Great Big Cuddle illustrated by Chris Riddell and written by Michael Rosen

Two of the biggest names in children’s publishing, Michael Rosen and Chris Riddell, come together in a new poetry collection. The poems in A Great Big Cuddle fizz off the page with sound and rhythm, energy and laughter, as Rosen captures in the most remarkable way what it means to be very, very young. A child’s world with all its details and feelings – toys and games, animals and made-up creatures, likes and dislikes – is vividly conjured up in the most memorable, playful language, and Chris Riddell has produced some his most extraordinary pictures ever to bring this world to life. It’s a book that will be enjoyed by the oldest grown-up and the youngest child – and a future classic.

This is an unusual size for a picture book, but the layout of each poem works to give the reader a different experience every time a page is turned. The poems requiring movement have that in abundance in both typography and in the illustration. The simple primary colour palette makes the illustrations bold and engaging. There is a creative use of the vignettes that really adds to the textual experience. The illustrations underline the nonsense of the poetry making this a very satisfying and distinctive experience. Two people at the height of their powers combining to make a great book for very young people.

journeyThe Journey illustrated and written by Francesca Sanna

What is it like to have to leave everything behind and travel many miles to somewhere unfamiliar and strange? A mother and her two children set out on such a journey; one filled with fear of the unknown, but also great hope. Based on her interactions with people forced to seek a new home, and told from the perspective of a young child, The Journey is full of significance for our time.

These timely and distinctive illustrations offer a deep and emotional introduction to the losses and experiences that immigrant families face. A strong sense of movement is achieved throughout, as the family journey onwards in a quest for safety. The menace of war and evil are particularly well depicted through the imposing black sea representing the approaching war, and dense black shadows that bring a real and deep darkness with them. A carefully chosen palette of colours, tones and techniques are used to great effect in the depiction of both physical and emotional landscapes. Impressive use of the endpapers is made, as they respectively introduce and then continue the story. An unusual typeface is used for the sparse, yet moving text, resembling handwriting this poignantly emphasises the personal nature of the story. This book will have a powerful impact on readers of all ages.

marvelsThe Marvels illustrated and written by Brian Selznick

In The Marvels, Selznick weaves together two seemingly unrelated stories- one in words, the other in pictures -with spellbinding synergy. The illustrated story begins in 1766 with Billy Marvel, the lone survivor of a shipwreck, and charts the adventures of his family of actors over five generations. The prose story opens in 1990 and follows Joseph, who has run away from school to an estranged uncle’s puzzling house in London, where he, along with the reader, must piece together many mysteries. Filled with mystery, vibrant characters, surprise twists, and heart-rending beauty, and featuring Selznick’s most arresting art to date, The Marvels is a moving tribute to the power of story.

This visually stunning book invites exploration from the first page. The whole production is a work of art that is outstanding on every level. Detailed cross-hatched illustrations carry the reader’s focus to the heart of characters, action and drama through a near-cinematic zooming in and panning out. There is a strong use of space and a real awareness of how different forms. come together to produce a story, creating an innovative and fully immersive experience.

tribeThere is a Tribe of Kids illustrated and written by Lane Smith

Lane Smith takes us on a colourful adventure through the natural world, following a child as he weaves through the jungle, dives under the ocean and soars into the sky. Along the way he makes friends and causes mischief with a dazzling array of creatures both large and small – but can he find a tribe of his own? Full of warmth and humour, There Is a Tribe of Kids is a playful exploration of wild childhood – of curiosity, discovery and what it means to belong.

There’s a wonderful sense of movement, animation and life in the illustrations to this book. A palette comprised of muted earth tones emphasises and extends the natural tone and themes of the book. Use of sequencing is controlled and there is an impressive synergy and balance between text and illustration. There is a warmth and wit in the play and imagination shown in the final spreads showing how the children are influenced and inspired by the world around them suggesting ideas around the way nurture and environmental factors can be formative in growth.

You can borrow these books from our libraries, so check out our catalogue to see if it’s in a library near you: http://bit.ly/1zSCJlf

The winners of the 2016 Medals and inaugural Amnesty CILIP Honours have been announced.

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One by Sarah Crossan

Grace and Tippi are conjoined twins. And their lives are about to change. No longer able to afford homeschooling, they must venture into the world – a world of stares, sneers and cruelty. Will they find more than that at school? Can they find real friends? And what about love? But what neither Grace nor Tippi realises is that a heart-wrenching decision lies ahead. A decision that could tear them apart. One that will change their lives even more than they ever imagined.

No words are wasted in this poignant and thought-provoking novel, yet it conveys so much. Written in free verse, each chapter is a poem and a work of art in its own right, collectively they create a highly emotive and engaging story. This creative style quickly draws the reader into the characters’ lives and creates a strong sense of urgency. The two main characters are impressively distinctive and developed, their contrasting temperaments highlighting their closeness and interdependence. This is a deeply moving, insightful, beautifully observed and unusual, but perfectly crafted, book that will stay with the reader long after its close.

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The Sleeper and the Spindle written by Neil Gaiman and Illustrated by Chris Riddell.

On the eve of her wedding, a young queen sets out to rescue a princess from an enchantment. She casts aside her fine wedding clothes, takes her chain mail and sword and follows her brave dwarf retainers into the tunnels under the mountain towards the sleeping kingdom. This queen will decide her own future – and the princess who needs rescuing is not quite what she seems. Twisting together the familiar and the new, this perfectly delicious, captivating and darkly funny tale shows its creators at the peak of their talents.

This book is an absolutely stunning artefact in its own right. The gothic style of Chris Riddell’s mainly black and white pen and ink illustrations, with gold highlights, creates a truly magical fairy tale appeal for Neil Gaiman’s story. The detail and complexity of the illustrations allows the eye to enjoy the sumptuous pleasures of the clever use of such a limited palette – for example the deep shine of the Queen’s dark hair. The pictures are spooky, threatening, mysterious and inviting all at the same time with the daring use of solid black areas in many of the pictures heightening the general air of mystery and foreboding. This book will be appreciated by readers of all ages.

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It’s 1959. The battle for civil rights is raging. And it’s Sarah’s first day of school as one of the first black students at previously all-white Jefferson High. No one wants Sarah there. Not the Governor. Not the teachers. And certainly not the students – especially Linda, daughter of the town’s most ardent segregationist. Sarah and Linda are supposed to despise each other. But the more time they spend together, the less their differences matter. And both girls start to feel something they’ve never felt before. Something they’re determined to ignore. Because it’s one thing to stand up to an unjust world – but another to be terrified of what’s in your own heart.

The story is told from the point of view of Sarah and of Linda, the white daughter of one of the town’s most vehement segregationists. Both voices are authentic, flawed teenagers searching for their sense of self, and yet able to grow throughout the book. The shocking historical use of language as spoken at the time is discomforting for the reader, but creates a sense of the real experience of the daily abuse depicted. With themes of race and sexuality this is a book which could have been almost impossible to read but the style makes it gripping and involving with an emotional response from the reader inevitable.

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Poor Mouse! A bear has settled in his favourite chair and that chair just isn’t big enough for two. Mouse tries all kinds of tactics to move the pesky Bear but nothing works and poor Mouse gives up. Once Mouse has eventually gone, Bear gets up and walks home. But what’s that? Is that a Mouse in Bear’s house?!

Ross Collins portrays perfectly the anger and frustration of the mouse at the deliberate provocative snub from the bear through beautiful, bold, confident yet simple drawings. Colour is used to great effect; background and font colours reflect the mood of the mouse with red used to depict pure anger. The book is littered with visual humour that can be enjoyed at many different levels, from the facial expressions of both mouse and bear to more adult references to Elvis and endangered species. Ross Collins uses the double page spread effectively; he is not afraid to leave space and through this ensures that the mouse and bear are always the focus of the illustration. With text and story that are in perfect synergy this is a complete package from cover to cover.

One of the national judge was our children’s librarian Elizabeth McDonald, who got to attend the awards ceremony on Monday June 20th at The British Library in London.

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You can watch the award ceremony here: http://www.carnegiegreenaway.org.uk/stream.php

To borrow these books, check out our catalogue to see if it’s in a library near you: http://bit.ly/1zSCJlf

Kate Greenaway Award Longlisted Books to explore

We are posting book reviews about all of the long listed books, let us know your thoughts on each of these amazing titles.

Goth Girl and the Fete Worse Than Death illustrated and written by Chris Riddell

goth girlPreparations for the Ghastly-Gorm Garden Party and bake-off are under way. Celebrity cooks are arriving at the hall for the big event and, true to form, Maltravers, the indoor gamekeeper, is acting suspiciously. Elsewhere at Ghastly-Gorm Ada’s wardrobe-dwelling lady’s maid Marylebone the bear has received a marriage proposal. Ada vows to aid the course of true love and find out what Maltravers is up to, but amidst all this activity, everyone, including her father, appears to have forgotten her birthday!

This book is a flavoursome tale filled with warmth and humour, and Chris’s iconic illustrations are the icing on the cake.

 

 

Animalium illustrated by Katie Scott, written by Jenny Broom

 

animaliumWelcome to the museum! There are more than 160 animal specimens to be discovered in Animalium, the first in a series of virtual museums. Wander the galleries and discover a collection of curated exhibits on every page, accompanied by informative text.

Stunning fine-lined drawings  of these animal images.  Each image is labeled with a number or letters keyed to a glossary that includes identification (including Latin name and size) and a general explanation, usually on the opposite page.

The section dividers and endpapers employ an intriguing reversal with groups of drawings shown as white silhouettes against a dark background.

The use of dissection images, the groupings and the lack of environmental background contribute to the gallery effect. After introducing the tree of life and the theory of natural selection, this exhibition begins with invertebrates and continues through fish, amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals, pointing out evolutionary developments along the way.

You can borrow these books from our libraries, so check out our catalogue to see if it’s in a library near you: http://bit.ly/1zSCJlf