What’s On for Children in Lower Earley Library February Half-term 2019

What’s On for Children in Lower Earley Library  February Half-term 2019

Explore Learning – Fun with Phonics* – The children will investigate rhyming words and why they rhyme. They will use their phonics to help them sound the words accurately. What do the words bat, hat and rat all have in common? Free session with Explore Learning, for children aged 4 to 6 years old.

Thursday February 21         9.30am to 10.30am

Explore Learning – Angular Architecture* – Pop on your hard hats as the children become architects. They will learn the areas and angles required to construct the homes of our future. Can they tell their right angles from their acute. Free session with Explore Learning, for children aged 7 to 9 years old.

Thursday February 21                 10.45am to 11.45am

Storytime with author Rachel Jane – Come and join author Rachel Jane to listen to Lil’s Cupcake Delivery. Enjoy the story of Lil the Campervan on her quest to help her friend deliver all of her cupcakes and, see if she can deliver them all on time and in one piece! Please book at the library.

Thursday February 21                 1.30pm to 2.30pm

To book call Lower Earley Library on 0118 931 2156

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John Hook -author visit to Wokingham Library on March 6th

Local author John Hook will be visiting Wokingham Library  talk about his debut novel Top Meadow.

Minnow, a young peasant lad grows from child to manhood in this novel set in medieval Berkshire at around the time of Henry 11

Discover how the longest establised building in Wokingham, a physically challenged youth, a Euopean experienced cook and three additional complete strangers from across the Narrow Sea combine to affect the lives of a small community

The event includes a book signing

Wokingham Library

Wednesday March 6 10.30am to 11.30am

Free Event

To book a place call the library on (0118) 9781368


Wellcome Book Prize Longlist 2019

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The Wellcome Book Prize longlist for 2019 has been announced, celebrating the many ways in which literature can illuminate the breadth and depth of our relationship with health, medicine and illness.

The longlist of twelve titles was selected by a judging panel chaired by author Elif Shafak with Jon Day, Viv Groskop, Kevin Fong and Rick Edwards.

  • Amateur: A true story about what makes a man by Thomas Page McBee Non-fiction

9781786890979[1]“Thomas Page McBee, a trans man, trains to fight in a charity match at Madison Square Garden while struggling to untangle the vexed relationship between masculinity and violence. Through his experience of boxing – learning to get hit, and to hit back; wrestling with the camaraderie of the gym; confronting the betrayals and strength of his own body – McBee examines the weight of male violence, the pervasiveness of gender stereotypes and the limitations of conventional masculinity.”

  • Astroturf by Matthew Sperling Fiction9781787471146[1]

“At 30, Ned is in a rut. His girlfriend has dumped him, his job is boring and he lives in a dismal bedsit. While others around him climb the property ladder and get ahead, he seems destined to remain one of life’s plodders. Encouraged by a friend to try using steriods to bulk up his frame, Ned is thrilled to discover a new vitality within himself. Physical changes are only the beginning: his mental state is clearer, he feels more confident and, most thrillingly of all, friends and lovers alike seem compelled by this new improved Ned. Using his knowledge of the murky yet surprising online world of steroids, Ned begins to build a business and discovers that his talents can take him further than he ever thought possible. But when is new life is threatened, he finds himself doing things he never would have dared to do before. And it all seems to be going fine.”

  • Educated by Tara Westover Non-fiction

9780099511021[1]“Tara Westover grew up preparing for the End of Days, watching for the sun to darken, for the moon to drip as if with blood. She spent her summers bottling peaches and her winters rotating emergency supplies, hoping that when the World of Men failed, her family would continue on, unaffected. She hadn’t been registered for a birth certificate. She had no school records because she’d never set foot in a classroom, and no medical records because her father didn’t believe in doctors or hospitals. According to the state and federal government, she didn’t exist. As she grew older, her father became more radical, and her brother, more violent. At sixteen Tara decided to educate herself. Her struggle for knowledge would take her far from her Idaho mountains, over oceans and across continents, to Harvard and to Cambridge. Only then would she wonder if she’d travelled too far.”

  • Freshwater by Akwaeke Emezi Fiction9780571345397[1]

“Narrated from the perspectives of the various selves within Ada, and based in the author’s realities, ‘Freshwater’ explores the metaphysics of identity and being.”

 

 

  • Heart: a History by Sandeep Jauhar Non-fiction

9781786072955[1]“A doctor’s inspiring obsession with the heart, seamlessly combining history, gripping scenes from the operating theatre and a moving personal story.”

 

 

 

 

  • Mind on Fire: A memoir of madness and recovery by Arnold Thomas Fanning Non-fiction

“Arnold Thomas Fanning had his first experience of depression during adolescence, 9781844884292[1]following the death of his mother. Some ten years later, an up-and-coming playwright, he was overcome by mania and delusions. Thus began a terrible period in which he was often suicidal, increasingly disconnected from family and friends, sometimes in trouble with the law, and homeless in London. Drawing on his own memories, the recollections of people who knew him when he was at his worst, and medical and police records, Arnold Thomas Fanning has produced a beautifully written, devastatingly intense account of madness – and recovery, to the point where he has not had any serious illness for over a decade and has become an acclaimed playwright.”

  • Murmur by Will Eaves Fiction

9781909585263[1]“Murmur is an original imagining of how the mathematician Alan Turing may have responded to the punishment imposed on him by the state – chemical castration – following his conviction for gross indecency. Alan Turing was more than just a member of the team that cracked the wartime Enigma code using a machine akin to an early computer, impressive though this achievement may be. He was a mathematician and theoretical biologist who pioneered ideas on artificial intelligence.”

 

  • My Year of Rest and Relaxation by Otessa Moshfegh Fiction

“A shocking, hilarious and strangely tender novel about a young woman’s experiment in 9781787330412[1]narcotic hibernation, aided and abetted by one of the worst psychiatrists in the annals of literature. Our narrator has many of the advantages of life, on the surface. Young, thin, pretty, a recent Columbia graduate, she lives in an apartment on the Upper East Side of Manhattan paid for, like everything else, by her inheritance. But there is a vacuum at the heart of things, and it isn’t just the loss of her parents in college, or the way her Wall Street boyfriend treats her, or her sadomasochistic relationship with her alleged best friend. It’s the year 2000 in a city aglitter with wealth and possibility; what could be so terribly wrong?”

  • Polio: The Odyssey of Eradication by Thomas Abraham Non-fiction

9781849049566[1]“Polio is still rife in poorer parts of the world. This is a rare look inside the global effort to tackle this potentially deadly disease, against the odds.”

 

 

 

 

  • Sight by Jessie Greengrass Fiction

“In ‘Sight’ a woman recounts her progress to motherhood, while remembering the death 9781473652392[1]of her own mother, and the childhood summers she spent with her psychoanalyst grandmother. Woven among these personal recollections are significant events in medical history: Wilhelm Rontgen’s discovery of the X-ray and his production of an image of his wife’s hand; Sigmund Freud’s development of psychoanalysis and the work that he did with his daughter, Anna; John Hunter’s attempts to set surgery on a scientific footing and his work, as a collaborator with his brother William and the artist Jan van Rymsdyk, on the anatomy of pregnant bodies. What emerges is the realisation that while the search for understanding might not lead us to an absolute truth, it is an end in itself.”

  • The Trauma Cleaner by Sarah Krasnostein Non-fiction

9781925498523[1]“Before she was a trauma cleaner, Sandra Pankhurst was many things: husband and father, drag queen, gender reassignment patient, sex worker, small businesswoman, trophy wife. But as a little boy, raised in violence and excluded from the family home, she just wanted to belong. Now she believes her clients deserve no less. A woman who sleeps among garbage she has not put out for 40 years. A man who bled quietly to death in his loungeroom. A woman who lives with rats, random debris and terrified delusion. The still life of a home vacated by accidental overdose.”

 

  • This Really Isn’t About You by Jean Hannah Edelstein Non-fiction

“In 2014 I moved back to the United States after living abroad for 14 years, my whole 9781509863808[1]adult life, because my father was dying. Six weeks after I arrived in New York City, my father died. Six months after that I learned that I too was a carrier of the gene that caused the cancer that had killed him. When Jean Hannah Edelstein’s world overturned she was forced to confront some of the big questions: how do we cope with grief? How does life change when we realise we’re not invincible? Does knowing our likely fate make it harder or easier to face the future?”

 

 

Three debut novels appear on this year’s longlist: Sight, Freshwater and Astroturf. The two further novels look at what great bodily change can do to a person’s mind.

Memoirs dominate the seven non-fiction titles on the list, sharing stories including mortality, modern masculinity and attitudes towards medical innovation.

The shortlist for the prize will be announced on Tuesday 19 March, with the winner revealed at an evening ceremony on Wednesday 1 May at Wellcome Collection.

Reserve your copy via the Wokingham Borough Libraries website at www.wokingham.gov.uk/libraries/library-services/search-renew-and-reserve-items/  

Waterstone’s Children’s Book Prize 2019

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The Waterstone’s Children’s Book Prize Shortlist for 2019 has been announced. The category winners and ultimate overall winner will be unveiled on Thursday 21 March.

Illustrated Books Shortlist

Sparking the imaginations of the very youngest readers, the Illustrated Books Shortlist is a celebration of creative talent across every genre of children’s publishing. Bursting with life, invention and laugh-aloud humour, whether it’s a superbly silly rhyming canine roll-call or a tender, painterly story of identity or a catalogue of real life heroes, these are books that explore the breadth and depth of where words and pictures can lead us.

  • Mini Rabbit Not Lost by John Bond
  • Little Leaders: Bold Women in Black History by Vashti Harrison
  • 100 Dogs by Michael Whaite
  • Julian is a Mermaid by Jessica Love
  • The King Who Banned the Dark by Emily Haworth-Booth
  • The Girls by Lauren Ace

Younger Fiction Shortlist

Marking the beginning of a journey into independent reading, our Younger Fiction category is where many children lose their hearts to books forever. This year’s list is full of future favourites, crossing magical lands, tackling far-flung adventures and spinning new fairy tales to exploring what matters much closer to home.

  • Brightstorm: a Sky-Ship Adventure by Vashti Hardy
  • The House with Chicken Legs by Sophie Anderson
  • The Train to Impossible Places by P.G. Bell
  • The boy at the Back of the Class by Onjali Q. Rauf
  • The Mystery of the Colour Thief by Ewa Jozefkowicz
  • The Boy who Grew Dragons by Andy Shepherd

Older Fiction Shortlist

Standing on the cusp of the most daring and experimental new trends – not to mention where Hollywood comes calling – Older Fiction is where some of the most exciting contemporary storytelling happens. Amongst the astonishing range and diversity on display there’s the sweeping, fantasy of rich and strange new worlds alongside myth-born epic and cutting edge contemporary drama: talent to take your breath away.

  • Boy 87 by Ele Fountain
  • Children of Blood and Bone by Toni Adeyemi
  • Me Mam. Me Dad. Me. by Malcolm Duffy
  • The Poet X by Elizabeth Acevedo
  • The Truth about Lies by Tracy Darnton
  • A Winter’s Promise by Christelle Dabos

Reserve your copy via the Wokingham Borough Libraries website at www.wokingham.gov.uk/libraries/library-services/search-renew-and-reserve-items/ 

 

 

What’s On for Children at Woodley Library February Half-term 2019

What’s On for Children at Woodley Library February Half-term 2019

The Magic Tinderbox – Join The Enchanted Players Theatre Company in this show about a soldier on a special journey, we ask the children to help him with his important decisions, The moral being: “To be happy with what you have, not to crave for more.” with free face painting after the show.  Please book at the library, £5 charge per person.

Woodley Library                 Monday February 18                    2.30pm to 3.30pm

Sand Art– Just drop in and create a picture with Kids Bee Happy with Maddi. £4 per picture, for children aged 4 to 11 years old.

Woodley Library                 Wednesday February 20             10.30am to 12.30pm

Storytime with author Rachel Jane – Come and join author Rachel Jane to listen to Lil’s Cupcake Delivery. Enjoy the story of Lil the Campervan on her quest to help her friend deliver all of her cupcakes and, see if she can deliver them all on time and in one piece! Please book at the library.

Woodley Library                 Thursday February 21                   10.30am to 11.30am

Explore Learning – Fun with Phonics* – The children will investigate rhyming words and why they rhyme. They will use their phonics to help them sound the words accurately. What do the words bat, hat and rat all have in common? Free session with Explore Learning, for children aged 4 to 6 years old.

Woodley Library                 Friday February 22                        9.30am to 10.30am

Explore Learning – Angular Architecture* – Pop on your hard hats as the children become architects. They will learn the areas and angles required to construct the homes of our future. Can they tell their right angles from their acute. Free session with Explore Learning, for children aged 7 to 9 years old.

Woodley Library                 Friday February 22                        10.45am to 11.45am

 

To book contact Woodley Library on 0118 969 0304

What’s On for Children at Wokingham Library during February Half-term 2019

What’s On for Children at Wokingham Library  during February Half-term 2019 

Guide Dog Morning – Just drop into learn and meet guide dogs and their owners.

Wokingham Library           Monday February 18        10am to 12noon

Sand Art– Just drop in and create a picture with Kids Bee Happy with Maddi. £4 per picture, for children aged 4 to 11 years old.

Wokingham Library           Tuesday February 19       10.30am to 12.30pm

Storytime – Stories and rhymes for children aged 7 and under. Free

Wokingham Library           Tuesday February 19        4pm to 4.30pm

Explore Learning – Fun with Phonics* – The children will investigate rhyming words and why they rhyme. They will use their phonics to help them sound the words accurately. What do the words bat, hat and rat all have in common? Free session with Explore Learning, for children aged 4 to 6 years old. Places must be booked.

Wokingham Library           Wednesday February 20  9.30am to 10.30am

Rhymetime – Rhymes for under 5’s and their parents, Just drop in! Free Event

Wokingham Library           Wednesday February 20     10am and 11am

Explore Learning – Angular Architecture* – Pop on your hard hats as the children become architects. They will learn the areas and angles required to construct the homes of our future. Can they tell their right angles from their acute. Free session with Explore Learning, for children aged 7 to 9 years old. Places must be booked.

Wokingham Library           Wednesday February 20   10.45am to 11.45am

Quirks Animal Roadshow – Quirks Animal Roadshow will allow children to interact with a variety of animals. For families with children aged 4 to 12 years old. Please phone to book a place, £ 4 per child.

Wokingham Library          Thursday February 21      11am to 12noon

Get Arty – Arts and crafts for children aged 4 to 12 years old. £1.50 charge, Just drop in!

Wokingham Library           Friday February 22           10.30am to 11.30am

To book any of the events call Wokingham Library on 0118 978 1368

What’s On for Children in Wokingham Borough Libraries February Half-term 2019

What’s On for Children in Wokingham Borough Libraries  February Half-term 2019

Explore Learning – Angular Architecture* – Pop on your hard hats as the children become architects. They will learn the areas and angles required to construct the homes of our future. Can they tell their right angles from their acute. Free session with Explore Learning, for children aged 7 to 9 years old.

  • Wokingham Library  Wednesday February 20   10.45am to 11.45am
  • Lower Earley Library    Thursday February 21    10.45am to 11.45am
  • Woodley Library   Friday February 22  10.45am to 11.45am

Explore Learning – Fun with Phonics* – The children will investigate rhyming words and why they rhyme. They will use their phonics to help them sound the words accurately. What do the words bat, hat and rat all have in common? Free session with Explore Learning, for children aged 4 to 6 years old.

  • Wokingham Library  Wednesday February 20    9.30am to 10.30am
  • Lower Earley Library   Thursday February 21     9.30am to 10.30am
  • Woodley Library  Friday February 22                    9.30am to 10.30am

Get Arty – Arts and crafts for children aged 4 to 12 years old. £1.50 charge, Just drop in!

Wokingham Library       Friday February 22        10.30am to 11.30am

Guide Dog Morning – Just drop into learn and meet guide dogs and their owners.

Wokingham Library    Monday February 18 10am to 12noon

Quirks Animal Roadshow – Quirks Animal Roadshow will allow children to interact with a variety of animals. For families with children aged 4 to 12 years old. Please phone to book a place, £ 4 per child.

  • Wargrave Library    Wednesday February 20   11am to 12noon
  • Wokingham Library    Thursday February 21    11am to 12noon

Rhymetime – Rhymes for under 5’s and their parents, Just drop in! Free Event

  • Twyford Library  Tuesday February 19    11am to 11.30am
  • Finchampstead Library    Friday February 22      11am to 11.30am
  • Wokingham Library Wednesday February 20  10am and 11am

Sand Art– Just drop in and create a picture with Kids Bee Happy with Maddi. £4 per picture, for children aged 4 to 11 years old.

  • Wokingham Library    Tuesday February 19    10.30am to 12.30pm
  • Woodley Library    Wednesday February 20    10.30am to 12.30pm

Storytime – Stories and rhymes for children aged 7 and under. Free

  • Twyford Library   Tuesday February 19      3.45pm to 4.15pm
  • Wokingham Library    Tuesday February 19   4pm to 4.30pm

Storytime with author Rachel Jane – Come and join author Rachel Jane to listen to Lil’s Cupcake Delivery. Enjoy the story of Lil the Campervan on her quest to help her friend deliver all of her cupcakes and, see if she can deliver them all on time and in one piece! Please book at the library.

  • Lower Earley Library  Thursday February 21      1.30pm to 2.30pm
  • Woodley Library    Thursday February 21      10.30am to 11.30am

The Magic Tinderbox – Join The Enchanted Players Theatre Company in this show about a soldier on a special journey, we ask the children to help him with his important decisions, The moral being: “To be happy with what you have, not to crave for more.” with free face painting after the show.  Please book at the library, £5 charge per person.

Woodley Library       Monday February 18    2.30pm to 3.30pm

All events must be booked unless otherwise stated, please contact the relevant library to book your place.

Wokingham Borough Libraries Contact details

Arborfield Library 0780 1664520Finchampstead Library (0118) 908 8176 Wargrave Library (0118) 940 4656Winnersh Library (0118) 979 7519
Lower Earley Library (0118) 931 2150Spencers Wood Library (0118) 988 4771 Wokingham Library (0118) 978 1368Woodley Library (0118) 969 0304
Twyford Library (0118) 934 0800

Recommended Books for children in support of LGBT History Month 2019

Recommended Books for children in support of LGBT History Month 2019

Heather has two mummies by Lesléa Newman – Heather’s favourite number is two – she has two arms, two legs, two pets and two lovely mummies. But when Heather goes to school for the first time, someone asks her about her daddy – and Heather doesn’t have a daddy! But then the class all draw portraits of their families, and not one single drawing is the same. Heather and her classmates realise – it doesn’t matter who makes up a family, the most important thing is that all the people in it love one another very much.

Josh and Jaz have three mums by Hedi Argent ; illustrations by Amanda Wood – This illustrated book for children aged five to eight helps to explain the diversity and ‘difference’ of family groups, and encourages an understanding and appreciation of same sex parents

And Tango makes three by Justin Richardson and Peter Parnell ; illustrated by Henry Cole. – The heartwarming true story of two penguins that create a nontraditional family.
At the penguin house at the Central Park Zoo, two penguins named Roy and Silo were a little bit different from the others. But their desire for a family was the same. And with the help of a kindly zookeeper, Roy and Silo got the chance to welcome a baby penguin of their very own.

This is my family : a first look at same-sex parents by Pat Thomas and illustrated by Lesley Harker This text introduces children to families that have parents of the same sex. Whether a family has a mum and a dad, or two mums or two dads, this book shows that all parents love, care, and support their children in the same way.

 

My princess boy by Cheryl Kilodavis and illustrated by Suzanne DeSimone.  A heart-warming true story of love and acceptance A nonfiction picture book about acceptance. With words and illustrations even the youngest of children can understand, My Princess Boy tells the tale of a four-year-old boy who happily expresses his authentic self by dressing up in dresses, and enjoying traditional girl things such as jewelry and anything pink or sparkly. The book is from a mom’s point of view, sharing both good and bad observations and experiences with friends and family, at school and in shopping stores.

Introducing Teddy by Jessica Walton  Errol and his teddy, Thomas, are best friends who do everything together. Whether it’s riding a bike, playing in the tree house, having a tea party or all of the above, every day holds something fun to do together. One sunny day, Errol finds that Thomas the Teddy is sad, and Errol can’t figure out why. Then Thomas the Teddy finally tells Errol what Teddy has been afraid to say: ‘In my heart, I’ve always known that I’m a girl teddy, not a boy teddy. I wish my name was Tilly.’ And Errol says, ‘I don’t care if you’re a girl teddy or a boy teddy! What matters is that you are my friend.’ A sweet and gentle story about being true to yourself and being a good friend, Introducing Teddy can also help children understand gender identity.

Baking with dad by Aurora Cacciapuoti  When dad decides it’s baking day, be prepared for creative chaos! From choosing the recipe and sorting the ingredients, to storing the mix and baking in the oven, each moment is full of surprises! Follow this comical, culinary adventure to discover what they are baking and who will be there to eat it!

We are family by Patricia Hegarty and illustrated by Ryan Wheatcroft All families are different – and yet in many ways the same! This book uses a gentle rhyming text to follow eight different families, celebrating their everyday differences as well as the similarities they share.

The same inside : poems about empathy and friendship by Liz Brownlee, Matt Goodfellow and Roger Stevens. A sweet and thoughtful collection of poems about friendship, diversity, empathy and respect. These poems deal sensitively with tolerance for differences (including race, religion and gender identity), feelings, empathy, respect, courtesy, bullying, disability and responsibility. They are the perfect springboard to start conversations.

Understanding transgender by Honor Head Exploring the issue of people who feel they do belong to the gender they were born with, this sensitive book looks at what this means for the person and their family, issues around school policy, bullying and discrimination and explores the journey of transitioning.

I’m a girl! By Yasmeen Ismail I’m supposed to be made of sugar and spice and all things nice. But I’m sweet and sour and not a little flower. I am a girl! I am a girl! I am a girl! The girl in this book likes to win, she likes to be spontaneous, fast and strong, and because she also likes to dress in t-shirt and shorts, she is forever getting mistaken for a boy. And when she meets a boy who likes wearing princess dresses and playing dolls, they both quickly discover that they share interests that are wide and varied.

This day in June by Gayle E. Pitman ; illustrated by Kristyna Litten  In a wildly whimsical, validating, and exuberant reflection of the LGBT community, this title welcomes readers to experience a pride celebration and share in a day when we are all united. Also included is a reading guide chock-full of facts about LGBT history and culture, as well as a ‘Note to Parents and Caregivers’ with information on how to talk to children about sexual orientation and gender identity in age-appropriate ways.

Donovan’s big day by Leslea Newman ; illustrations by Mike Dutton  Donovan’s two moms are getting married, and he can’t wait for the celebration to begin. After all, as ringbearer, he has a very important job to do. Any boy or girl with same-sex parents will appreciate this picture book about love, family, and marriage.

Mommy, mama, and me by Leslea Newman ; illustrated by Carol Thompson  Rhythmic text and illustrations with universal appeal show a toddler spending the day with its mommies. From hide-and-seek to dress-up, then bath time and a kiss goodnight, there’s no limit to what a loving family can do together.

Under the love umbrella by Davina Bell ; illustrations by Allison Colpoys. Whatever you fear, come close my dear, you’re tucked in safe for always here, and I will never not be near. Because of our love umbrella. A celebration of the joy and comfort that is always with us, wherever we roam in the big, wild world.

Made by Raffi by Craig Pomranz ; illustrated by Margaret Chamberlain. Raffi is a shy boy who doesn’t like noisy games and is often teased at school. But when he gets the idea of making a scarf for his dad’s birthday he is full of enthusiasm, even though the other children think it is girly to knit. Then the day draws near for the school pageant, and there is one big problem – no costume for the prince. And that’s when Raffi has his most brilliant idea of all – to make a prince’s cape. On the day of the pageant, Raffi’s cape is the star of the show.

King and King by Linda de Haan and Stern Nijland.  When the queen insists that the prince get married and take over as king, the search for a suitable mate does not turn out as expected.

The great big book of families by Mary Hoffman ; illustrated by Ros Asquith. What is a family? Once, it was said to be a father, mother, boy, girl, cat and dog living in a house with a garden. But as times have changed, families have changed too. Mary Hoffman takes a look through children’s eyes at the wide varieties of family life, from homes, food and schools to holidays, jobs and housework.

Worm loves Worm by J.J. Austrian, Mike Curato. This picture book is a celebration of love in all its splendid forms from debut author J.J. Austrian and the acclaimed author-illustrator of ‘Little Elliot, Big City’, Mike Curato. You are cordially invited to celebrate the wedding of a worm and a worm. When a worm meets a special worm and they fall in love, you know what happens next: they get married! But their friends want to know who will wear the dress? And who will wear the tux? The answer is: it doesn’t matter. Because Worm loves Worm.

Julian is a mermaid by Jessica Love While riding the subway home with his Nana one day, Julian notices three women spectacularly dressed up. Their hair billows in brilliant hues, their dresses end in fishtails, and their joy fills the train carriage. When Julian gets home, daydreaming of the magic he’s seen, all he can think about is dressing up just like the ladies and making his own fabulous mermaid costume. But what will Nana think about the mess he makes – and even more importantly – what will she think about how Julian sees himself?

All of the recommended titles can be borrowed from Wokingham Borough Libraries https://wokingham.spydus.co.uk or visit www.wokingham.gov.uk/libraries

Recommended Books for Adults in support of LGBT History Month 2019

Recommended Books for Adults in support of LGBT History Month 2019

Adult Fiction

Oranges Are Not the Only Fruit by Jeanette Winterson
Like most people I lived for a long time with my mother and father. My father liked to watch the wrestling, my mother liked to wrestle; it didn’t matter what.” — Oranges Are Not the Only Fruit This is the story of Jeanette, adopted and brought up by her mother as one of God’s elect. Zealous and passionate, she seems destined for life as a missionary, but then she falls for one of her converts. At sixteen, Jeanette decides to leave the church, her home and her family, for the young woman she loves. Innovative, punchy and tender, Oranges Are Not the Only Fruit is a few days ride into the bizarre outposts of religious excess and human obsession.

The Hours by Michael Cunningham
The Hours is a daring and deeply affecting novel inspired by the life and work of Virginia Woolf. In 1920s London, Virginia Woolf is fighting against her rebellious spirit as she attempts to make a start on her new novel. A young wife and mother, broiling in a suburb of 1940s Los Angeles, yearns to escape and read her precious copy of Mrs Dalloway’. And Clarissa Vaughan steps out of her smart Greenwich village apartment in 1990s New York to buy flowers for a party she is hosting for a dying friend. Moving effortlessly across the decades and between England and America, this exquisite novel intertwines the stories of three unforgettable women.

Brideshead Revisited by Evelyn Waugh
Written at the end of the World War II, this novel mourns the passing of the aristocratic world which Waugh knew in his youth and recalls the sensuous pleasures denied him by the austerities of war. In so doing, it provides a study of the conflict between the demands of religion and of the flesh.

Death in Venice by Thomas Mann
Death in Venice tells the story of Gustav von Aschenbach, a successful but aging writer who follows his wanderlust to Venice in search of spiritual fulfillment that instead leads to his erotic doom. In the decaying city, besieged by an unnamed epidemic, he becomes obsessed with an exquisite Polish boy, Tadzio. “It is a story of the voluptuousness of doom,” Mann wrote. “But the problem I had especially in mind was that of the artist’s dignity

The Paying Guests by Sarah Waters
It is 1922, and London is tense. Ex-servicemen are disillusioned, the out-of-work and the hungry are demanding change. And in South London, in a genteel Camberwell villa, a large silent house now bereft of brothers, husband and even servants, life is about to be transformed, as impoverished widow Mrs Wray and her spinster daughter, Frances, are obliged to take in lodgers. As passions mount and frustration gathers, no one can foresee just how far-reaching, and how devastating, the disturbances will be.

 

Fried Green Tomatoes at the Whistle Stop Café by Fannie Flagg
The day Idgie Threadgoode and Ruth Jamison opened the Whistle Stop Cafe, the town took a turn for the better. It was the Depression and that cafe was a home from home for many of us. You could get eggs, grits, bacon, ham, coffee and a smile for 25 cents. Fried Green Tomatoes at the Whistle Stop Cafe is a mouth-watering tale of love, laughter and mystery.

The Song of Achilles by Madeline Miller  Greece in the age of heroes. Patroclus, an awkward young prince, has been exiled to the court of King Peleus and his perfect son Achilles. Despite their differences, Achilles befriends the shamed prince, and as they grow into young men skilled in the arts of war and medicine, their bond blossoms into something deeper – despite the displeasure of Achilles’s mother Thetis, a cruel sea goddess. But when word comes that Helen of Sparta has been kidnapped, Achilles must go to war in distant Troy and fulfill his destiny. Torn between love and fear for his friend, Patroclus goes with him, little knowing that the years that follow will test everything they hold dear.

 

Tell the Wolves I’m Home by Carol Rifka Brunt There’s only one person who has ever truly understood 14-year-old June Elbus, and that’s her uncle, the renowned painter, Finn Weiss. Shy at school and distant from her once inseparable older sister, June can only be herself in Finn’s company; he is her godfather, confident, and best friend.

 

Ghost Wall by Sarah Moss   Teenage Silvie is living in a remote Northumberland camp as an exercise in experimental archaeology. Her father is an abusive man, obsessed with recreating the discomfort, brutality and harshness of Iron Age life. Behind and ahead of Silvie’s narrative is a story of a bog girl, a sacrifice, a woman killed by those closes to her, and as the hot summer builds to a terrifying climax, Silvie and the Bog girl are in ever more terrifying proximity.

 

Call me By Your Name by Andre AcimanThis is the story of a sudden and powerful romance that blooms between 17-year-old Elio and his father’s house guest, Oliver, during a restless summer on the Italian Riviera. What grows from the depths of their souls is a romance of scarcely six weeks’ duration, and an experience that marks them for a lifetime.

This is How it Always is by Laurie Frankel  Rosie and Penn always wanted a daughter. Four sons later, they decide to try one last time – and their beautiful little boy Claude is born. Life continues happily for this big, loving family until the day when Claude says that, when he grows up, he wants to be a girl. As far as Rosie and Penn are concerned, bright, funny and wonderful Claude can be whoever he or she wants. But as problems begin at school and in the community, the family faces a seemingly impossible dilemma: should Claude change, or should they and Claude try to change the world?

A Ladder to the Sky by John Boyne  A psychological drama of cat and mouse, ‘A Ladder to the Sky’ shows how easy it is to achieve the world if you are prepared to sacrifice your soul. If you look hard enough, you can find stories pretty much anywhere. They don’t even have to be your own. Or so would-be writer Maurice Swift decides very early on in his career. A chance encounter in a Berlin hotel with celebrated novelist Erich Ackermann gives him an opportunity to ingratiate himself with someone more powerful than him. For Erich is lonely, and he has a story to tell. Whether or not he should do so is another matter entirely. Once Maurice has made his name, he sets off in pursuit of other people’s stories. He doesn’t care where he finds them – or to whom they belong – as long as they help him rise to the top.

Adult NonFiction

Inseparable: Desire between Women in Literature by Emma Donoghue
Love between women crops up throughout literature: from Chaucer and Shakespeare to Charlotte Bronte, Agatha Christie, and many more. In ‘Inseparable’, Emma Donoghue examines how desire between women in literature has been portrayed, from schoolgirls and vampires to runaway wives, from cross-dressing knights to contemporary murder stories.

Proud by Gareth Thomas  The autobiography of former Welsh rugby player Gareth Thomas, who represented Wales in both rugby union and rugby league. Thomas announced publicly he was gay in 2009, making him the first openly gay professional rugby union player.

Good as You by Paul Flynn  ‘Good As You’ is the 30 year history of British gay culture – from the identification of the HIV virus in 1984, through Manchester’s self-selection as Britain’s gay capital, to Eastenders’ Colin and Barry’s first primetime televised gay kiss and the real-time romance of Elton John and David Furnish’s eventual marriage. Including candid interviews from major protagonists such as Kylie, Russell T. Davies and Holly Johnson, as well as the relative unknowns crucial to the gay community, Flynn charts the fight for equality both front of stage and in the wings.

Pride and Joy by Sarah and Rachel Hagger-Holt  ‘Pride and Joy’ is a practical, positive guide for lesbian, gay, bi and trans parents. It draws on experiences and advice from a diverse range of LGBT parents and their children.

The Oldest Gay in the Village by George Montague  Born in 1923, George Montague has seen many changes in his lifetime, few greater than the attitude towards being gay – attitudes that saw him criminalised for the sin of loving another man. This charming, funny book is a unique social history from a truly remarkable man.

Becoming Nicole by Amy Ellis Nut  This is the inspiring true story of a transgender girl, her identical twin brother, and an ordinary American family’s extraordinary journey to understand, nurture, and celebrate the uniqueness in us all.

Philomena by Martin Sixsmith  ‘Philomena’ is the tale of a mother and a son whose lives were scarred by the forces of hypocrisy on both sides of the Atlantic and of the secrets they were forced to keep. A compelling narrative of human love and loss, Martin Sixsmith’s moving account is both heartbreaking yet ultimately redemptive.

Trans Britain edited by Christine Burns  Over the last five years, transgender people have seemed to burst into the public eye. From our television screens to the ballot box, transgender had suddenly become part of the zeitgeist. This apparently overnight emergence, though, is just the latest stage in a long and varied history. The renown of Paris Lees and Hari Nef has its roots in the efforts of those who fought for equality before them, but were met with apathy and often outright hostility from mainstream society. ‘Trans Britain’ chronicles this journey in the words of those who were there to witness a once invisible community grow into the powerful movement we recognise today.

Somebody to Love-The Life, Death and legacy of Freddie Mercury by Matt Richards  Including interviews from Freddie Mercury’s closest friends in the last years of his life, along with personal photographs, ‘Somebody to Love’ is an authoritative and humane biography of the great man.

Theft by Finding: Diaries Volume 1 by David Sedaris  The point is to find out who you are and to be true to that person. Because so often you can’t. Won’t people turn away if they know the real me? You wonder. The me that hates my own child, that put my perfectly healthy dog to sleep? The me who thinks, deep down, that maybe The Wire was overrated? For nearly four decades, David Sedaris has faithfully kept a diary in which he records his thoughts and observations on the odd and funny events he witnesses.

Gentleman Jack-the biography of Anne Lister by Angela Steidele  Anne Lister was a wealthy Yorkshire heiress, a world traveller and an out lesbian during the Regency era – a time when it was difficult simply to be female. She wrote her diary in code derived from Ancient Greek, including details of her liaisons with women. Liberated by her money, she remained unmarried, opened a colliery and chose to dress all in black. On inheriting Shibden Hall, Anne chose to travel abroad, before returning to Halifax and courting Ann Walker, another wealthy heiress twelve years her junior. They renovated Shibden Hall together and considered themselves married, to the horror of Walker’s relatives. The biography combines excerpts of Lister’s own diaries with Angela Steidele’s erudite and lively commentary.

Finding Stevie by Cathy Glass  When Stevie’s social worker tells Cathy, an experienced foster carer, that Stevie, 14, is gender fluid she isn’t sure what that term means and looks it up. Stevie, together with his younger brother and sister, have been brought up by their grandparents as their mother is in prison. But the grandparents can no longer cope with Stevie’s behaviour so they place him in care. Stevie is exploring his gender identity, and like many young people he spends time online. Cathy warns him about the dangers of talking to strangers online and advises him how to stay safe. When his younger siblings tell their grandmother that they have a secret they can’t tell, Cathy is worried. However, nothing could have prepared her for the truth when Stevie finally breaks down and confesses what he’s done.

All of the recommended titles can be borrowed from Wokingham Borough Libraries https://wokingham.spydus.co.uk or visit http://www.wokingham.gov.uk/libraries

What’s On for Children in Wokingham Borough Libraries February Half-term 2019

What’s On for Children in Wokingham Borough Libraries  February Half-term 2019

Explore Learning – Angular Architecture* – Pop on your hard hats as the children become architects. They will learn the areas and angles required to construct the homes of our future. Can they tell their right angles from their acute. Free session with Explore Learning, for children aged 7 to 9 years old.

  • Wokingham Library  Wednesday February 20   10.45am to 11.45am
  • Lower Earley Library    Thursday February 21    10.45am to 11.45am
  • Woodley Library   Friday February 22  10.45am to 11.45am

Explore Learning – Fun with Phonics* – The children will investigate rhyming words and why they rhyme. They will use their phonics to help them sound the words accurately. What do the words bat, hat and rat all have in common? Free session with Explore Learning, for children aged 4 to 6 years old.

  • Wokingham Library  Wednesday February 20    9.30am to 10.30am
  • Lower Earley Library   Thursday February 21     9.30am to 10.30am
  • Woodley Library  Friday February 22                    9.30am to 10.30am

Get Arty – Arts and crafts for children aged 4 to 12 years old. £1.50 charge, Just drop in!

Wokingham Library       Friday February 22        10.30am to 11.30am

Guide Dog Morning – Just drop into learn and meet guide dogs and their owners.

Wokingham Library    Monday February 18 10am to 12noon

Quirks Animal Roadshow – Quirks Animal Roadshow will allow children to interact with a variety of animals. For families with children aged 4 to 12 years old. Please phone to book a place, £ 4 per child.

  • Wargrave Library    Wednesday February 20   11am to 12noon
  • Wokingham Library    Thursday February 21    11am to 12noon

Rhymetime – Rhymes for under 5’s and their parents, Just drop in! Free Event

  • Twyford Library  Tuesday February 19    11am to 11.30am
  • Finchampstead Library    Friday February 22      11am to 11.30am
  • Wokingham Library Wednesday February 20  10am and 11am

Sand Art– Just drop in and create a picture with Kids Bee Happy with Maddi. £4 per picture, for children aged 4 to 11 years old.

  • Lower Earley Library   Monday February 18   10.30am to 12.30pm
  • Wokingham Library    Tuesday February 19    10.30am to 12.30pm
  • Woodley Library    Wednesday February 20    10.30am to 12.30pm

Storytime – Stories and rhymes for children aged 7 and under. Free

  • Twyford Library   Tuesday February 19      3.45pm to 4.15pm
  • Wokingham Library    Tuesday February 19   4pm to 4.30pm

Storytime with author Rachel Jane – Come and join author Rachel Jane to listen to Lil’s Cupcake Delivery. Enjoy the story of Lil the Campervan on her quest to help her friend deliver all of her cupcakes and, see if she can deliver them all on time and in one piece! Please book at the library.

  • Lower Earley Library  Thursday February 21      1.30pm to 2.30pm
  • Woodley Library    Thursday February 21      10.30am to 11.30am

The Magic Tinderbox – Join The Enchanted Players Theatre Company in this show about a soldier on a special journey, we ask the children to help him with his important decisions, The moral being: “To be happy with what you have, not to crave for more.” with free face painting after the show.  Please book at the library, £5 charge per person.

Woodley Library       Monday February 18    2.30pm to 3.30pm

All events must be booked unless otherwise stated, please contact the relevant library to book your place.

Wokingham Borough Libraries Contact details

Arborfield Library 0780 1664520

Finchampstead Library (0118) 908 8176

Wargrave Library (0118) 940 4656

Winnersh Library (0118) 979 7519

Lower Earley Library (0118) 931 2150

Spencers Wood Library (0118) 988 4771

Wokingham Library (0118) 978 1368

Woodley Library (0118) 969 0304

Twyford Library (0118) 934 0800